2000 Em 26 Asteroid Trajectory slooh asteroid 2000 em26 space rock passes earth as 2000 Trajectory 26 Em Asteroid

2000 Em 26 Asteroid Trajectory slooh asteroid 2000 em26 space rock passes earth as 2000 Trajectory 26 Em Asteroid

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However, according to many conspiracy theorists, all the U.S. landings on the moon were faked, and all the photos and videos were made only on the film stage.



and here is another

Triton is the largest of Neptune's 13 moons. It is an unusual world, twirling around its planet in the wrong direction. Many astronomers think that some time in the remote past, Triton was nudged out of its home in the Kuiper Belt, and during its wanderings in the darkness of interplanetary space, at last swept close enough to Neptune to feel the irresistible lure of that planet's gravity. As Neptune drew Triton into its gravitational embrace, that luckless wanderer from the Kuiper Belt underwent a sea-change from a comet-like denizen of our Solar System's outer limits, to a moon of one of the major planets. So, there Triton whirls around in its new home, circling its planet Neptune, but circling it backwards. And like all moons, it is now a dependent of its parent planet. As a matter of fact, the moon was given the name of Triton as an allusion to the demigod Triton's dependence on the sea-god Neptune in Greek mythology.



and finally

How am I so sure of this? Simple. Because I've personally been using the moon to my advantage for more than 20 years, and know how effective it is. Have you ever had one of those epic days fishing where it seemed like no matter what you threw in the water, you caught fish? If you have, it was more than likely due to the fact that the moon was in a certain phase, rather than your skills as an angler (I hate to burst anyone's bubble, but it's true).

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There is also a famous farmer's manual called the Maine Farmers Almanac, which was used to record the weather and moon phases. The first full moon of the month was recorded in red on the due date and the second full moon of the month, recorded in blue. This could be the first modern day origin of the term. When there are two full moons within a calendar month, in modern times the second full moon of the month is referred to by meteorologists and astronomers as a blue moon. This only occurs once every 33 months. Not that rare really. The last one was in July 2004 and the next after today's will not grace us with its presence until December 2009. Hence the term, "Once In a Blue Moon".



Saturn, along with its frozen retinue of icy rings, dazzling moons, and sparkling moonlets, orbits our Sun about ten times farther out than the Earth. Astronomers received their first collection of detailed data about Titan when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander arrived there in 2004. The Huygens lander successfully obtained revealing images when it drifted down to Titan's tormented, hydrocarbon-slashed surface, as well as when it was still floating slowly and softly down through the moon's thick, foggy, orange atmosphere--which has 1.4 times greater pressure than that of our own planet. These pictures, when combined with other studies using instruments aboard the Cassini orbiter, reveal to curious planetary scientists that Titan's geological features include lakes and river channels filled with methane, ethane, and propane. Titan's strange surface also shows mountains and sand dunes--and it is pockmarked by craters. The rippling dunes form when fierce winds sweep up loose particles from the surface and then tosses them downwind. However, the sands of Titan are not like the sands on our Earth. Titan's "sand" is both bizarre and alien, probably composed of very small particles of solid hydrocarbons--or, possibly, ice imprisoned within hydrocarbons--with a density of about one-third that of the sand on our own planet. Furthermore, Titan's gravity is low. In fact, it is only approximately one-seventh that of Earth. This means that, working in combination with the low density of Titan's sand particles, they carry only the small weight of a mere four percent that of terrestrial sand. Titan's "sand" is about the same light-weight as freeze-dried grains of coffee!



The more widely accepted theory that the planets and regular moons formed together from the same swirling cloud of gas and dust, works well as an explanation for the larger moons of our Solar System, such as the four Galilean moons--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--orbiting the giant planet Jupiter. However, the multitude of smaller moons, swarming around the giant planets, "have so far been considered a by-product," Dr. Crida commented in the November 29, 2012 Scientific American.