Asteroid Belt in Our Galaxy solar system how it was formed the sun planets Our in Galaxy Asteroid Belt

Asteroid Belt in Our Galaxy solar system how it was formed the sun planets Our in Galaxy Asteroid Belt

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Interesting facts about space.

Poor Pluto was discovered by the American Clyde Tombaugh in 1930, and it was appropriately named after the ancient Roman god of the underworld, shrouded as it is in the perpetual darkness of our Solar System's distant deep freeze. Charon was discovered in 1978 by the astronomer James Christy, also an American.



and here is another

Judith E. Braffman-Miller is a writer and astronomer whose articles have been published since 1981 in various newspapers, journals, and magazines. Although she has written on a variety of topics, she particularly loves writing about astronomy because it gives her the opportunity to communicate to others the many wonders of her field. Her first book, "Wisps, Ashes, and Smoke," will be published soon.



and finally

"This is still very much an area of active research, so there is much that scientists including our Department of Terrestrial Magnetism staff scientist Erik Hauri, as well as many other Carnegie colleagues and alumni, are figuring out about how much water exists on the Moon. This is a highly important and challenging question to answer given that we have limited knowledge on the history and distribution of lunar water," explained Dr. Miki Nakajima in a February 26, 2018 Carnegie Institution Press Release. Dr. Nakajima, who is of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (D.C.), along with California Institute of Technology's (Caltech's) Dr. David Stevenson, set out to determine whether prevailing lunar formation models need to be adjusted to explain more recent higher estimates of the quantity of water on Earth's Moon. Caltech is in Pasadena.

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Moons are natural satellites that circle around another body that, in turn, circles around its parent-star. The moon is held in place by both its own gravity and the gravitational pull of its planet. Some planets have moons, while others do not. Several asteroids are known to be circled by very small moons, and some dwarf planets--such as Pluto--also have moons. One of Pluto's quintet of moons, Charon, is about half the size of Pluto itself. Some planetary scientists propose that Charon is really a large chunk of Pluto that was torn off in a catastrophic collision with another wandering world long ago. Because Charon is almost 50% the size of Pluto, the two tiny icy bodies are sometimes considered to be a double-planet.



Discovering the water content of volcanic deposits on our Moon using orbital instruments presents quite a challenge. Planetary scientists use orbital spectrometers to measure the light that skips off of a planetary surface. By determining which electromagnetic wavelengths of light are reflected or absorbed by the surface, the scientists can then get an idea of which minerals and other compounds are present.



Now, by pinpointing the precise birthday of the Moon, Dr. Jacobson and his team can help to explain why the Moon and our planet are so mysteriously similar in their compositions.