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Interesting facts about space.

Our Moon's temperature reaches about 260 degrees Fahrenheit when under a full Sun. However, in darkness, the temperature dives down to approximately -280 degrees Fahrenheit.



and here is another

In addition to shedding new light on the lunar water-mystery, the new research could also have important implications for future exploration of Earth's Moon. The volcanic beads do not harbor a lot of water--only about.05 percent by weight--but the deposits are large, and the water could potentially be extracted.



and finally

The current study's Franco-Belgian-Japanese collaboration looks forward to this mission. JAXA plans to enlist them to conduct tests on the Martian samples when they are returned to Earth. The samples will help the scientists determine whether Phobos is indeed made up of a mixture of Martian mantle and debris left in the wake of the tragic crash of the doomed, vanished protoplanet--as suggested by their supercomputer simulations.

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There are more than 100 moons in orbit around the eight major planets of our Sun's family. Most of them are frozen worlds, primarily composed of ice with a smattering of rocky material, circling the four giant gaseous planets dwelling in the outer regions of our Solar System--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The inner region of our Solar System is almost completely devoid of moons. Earth's own lovely Moon is the largest one in our inner region of the Sun's family. Of the four rocky and relatively petite inner worlds that circle nearest to our Star--Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars--Mercury and Venus are moonless, while Mars is orbited by two lumpy and misshapen small moons, Phobos and Deimos, that are most likely captured asteroids that originated in the Main Asteroid Belt that orbits our Sun between Mars and Jupiter.



Most of the moons of our Solar System are icy little desolate and dead worlds, dwelling in the dark, cold stillness of those regions far from the warmth and light of our Sun. However, a few of these small bodies may not be lifeless. For example, Europa of Jupiter may have a subsurface global ocean of liquid water secreted beneath its cracked, jumbled frozen crust of ice. This subsurface ocean might be warmed by tidal flexing into a hospitable, life-friendly liquid-water state, where primitive life-forms may swim around in the deep-sea darkness beneath Europa's ice. In addition, the second-largest moon in our Solar System, Titan of Saturn, possesses an environment that is eerily similar to that of our own planet long before life evolved out of the lifeless ooze (prebiotic). Big, lazy raindrops of liquid hydrocarbons float to the surface of this tormented, frigid moon, forming seas and lakes composed of methane and ethane that play the same role as water on Earth. It is entirely possible that life, as we do not know it, can evolve and flourish using liquids other than water. The largest moon of our Solar System, Ganymede of Jupiter, is larger than the innermost planet Mercury. Like its sister-moon Europa, Ganymede may hold secreted, beneath its surface crust of ice, a global ocean of liquid water. The little icy moon, Enceladus of Saturn, spews out geysers of water mixed with ammonia (which plays the role of antifreeze) from its so-called "tiger stripes". Therefore, Enceladus could also harbor life-loving water hidden beneath its icy surface.



Asphaug and co-author Dr. Andreas Reufer of the University of Bern in Switzerland, devised their new giant impact model using sophisticated computer simulations. They discovered that mergers between moons the size of Jupiter's Galilean satellites--which range in size from 1,940 miles wide (Europa) to 3, 271 miles across (Ganymede)--would tear icy stuff off the outer layers of the colliding moons. This icy material would then form spiral arms, which would ultimately merge together due to gravitational attraction to create Saturn's mid-sized icy moons.