Asteroid Hyalosis B Scan commonuspictures Scan Asteroid B Hyalosis

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Interesting facts about space.

Jupiter, the largest planet in our Solar System, also has the largest moon--Ganymede. A large number of Jovian moons sport highly elliptical orbits and also circle backwards--that is, opposite to the spin of their planet. Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune also sport such so-called irregular moons, that orbit far from their respective parent planets.



and here is another

Like Earth's own large Moon, Triton is locked in synchronous rotation with its planet--one side always faces Neptune. However, because of Neptune's odd orbital inclination, both of the moon's polar regions take turns facing the Sun. Spacecraft images of Triton reveal mounds and round pits formed from icy lava flows (cryovolanism), as well as smooth volcanic plains. The surface of the moon is only sparsely cratered, indicating that its surface is new--that is, it is constantly being resurfaced, probably by the "lava" flow from icy volcanoes. Triton is very bright--its fresh, sparkling, new ice-coating is believed to cover a heart of metal and rock. Triton's high density suggests that it contains more rock in its interior than the icy moons of Saturn and Uranus.



and finally

"The good news is that our models show that observations of a wet Moon are not incompatible with a Giant Impact origin," Dr. Nakajima explained in the February 26 2018 Carnegie Institution Press Release.

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When a moon is in an orbit around its parent-planet, all is well--just as long as the gravity that is holding the moon together in one piece exceeds the powerful, relentless pull of its planet. Alas, if a moon wanders too close, and the tidal forces of the parent-planet exceed the gravitational bind of the unlucky moon, the moon will fall apart. This is termed the Roche limit. Earth's relatively large Moon is a very fortunate natural satellite, and the limit here is a bit under 10,000 kilometers--while our Moon is a safe 385,000 kilometers away from our planet.



The research published in the July 4, 2016 issue of Nature Geoscience highlights the main factor differentiating moon-birth around Mars and Earth: the differing rotation speeds of the two planets prompted "completely different tidal actions," Dr. Charnoz explained in the July 4, 2016 CNRS Press Release. Dr. Charnoz proposes that at the time of their respective impacts, "Earth took less than four hours to spin on its axis whereas Mars rotated very slowly over a 24-hour period." The result of this important difference caused Earth to hold on to its single, large Moon, while the Martian collision created a dozen smaller moons alongside a larger moon. As time went by, Martian tidal action--resulting from the planet's slow rotation rate--caused most of the moons, including the largest one, to crash back down to the surface of their parent-planet. As a result, only the two most distant moons, Phobos and Deimos, survived as testimony to the ancient catastrophe.



Following that last giant impact, Earth put on some weight, but this new weight gain was derived from impacts of much smaller bodies, only about the size of asteroids like Vesta. Dr. Jacobson and his team used the later weight gain in order to determine when the unfortunate Theia struck.