Asteroid Hyalosis B Scan pdf bilateral simultaneous acute angle closure Scan B Asteroid Hyalosis

Asteroid Hyalosis B Scan pdf bilateral simultaneous acute angle closure Scan B Asteroid Hyalosis

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Interesting facts about space.

Dr. Lieber and his colleagues did a study to test the theory of full-moon "lunacy". They studied data on murders in Dade County of Florida which covered 15 years and a total of 1,887 deaths by homicide. When they compared the deaths with the phases of the moon, they found that the two rose and fell together for the entire 15 years! With the approach of a full or new moon, there was a sharp spike in the murder rate, and then a decline during the first and last quarters of the moon.



and here is another

These days the use of the term, "Once In a Blue Moon", is a very common phrase in our language. In the English language the first known literary reference to a blue moon was in a poem by Roy and Barlow, written in 1528, entitled "Rede Me and Be Not Wrothe". An excerpt, "If they say the moon is belewe, we must believe it to be true." which is a reference to the English nobility. Commonly in this day and age and over the years a blue moon is used as a symbol of melancholy, sadness or loneliness in songs and poetry. We are literally accustomed to the idea of the moon or Lunar, as being a symbol of Romance or Love. Therefore a blue moon reflecting the idea of sadness or feeling 'blue'. The moon seems to be intrinsically connected to our emotions and for many of us, as is the case with your's truly if you have any faith in Astrology, Cancerians are ruled by the moon and their moods can be affected by the various phases of the moon. It was a little ironic to learn after having dragged oneself around shroud in melancholy this week, that there was in fact, a Blue Moon on the horizon. Coincidence?



and finally

There is also a famous farmer's manual called the Maine Farmers Almanac, which was used to record the weather and moon phases. The first full moon of the month was recorded in red on the due date and the second full moon of the month, recorded in blue. This could be the first modern day origin of the term. When there are two full moons within a calendar month, in modern times the second full moon of the month is referred to by meteorologists and astronomers as a blue moon. This only occurs once every 33 months. Not that rare really. The last one was in July 2004 and the next after today's will not grace us with its presence until December 2009. Hence the term, "Once In a Blue Moon".

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Saturn, along with its frozen retinue of icy rings, dazzling moons, and sparkling moonlets, orbits our Sun about ten times farther out than the Earth. Astronomers received their first collection of detailed data about Titan when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander arrived there in 2004. The Huygens lander successfully obtained revealing images when it drifted down to Titan's tormented, hydrocarbon-slashed surface, as well as when it was still floating slowly and softly down through the moon's thick, foggy, orange atmosphere--which has 1.4 times greater pressure than that of our own planet. These pictures, when combined with other studies using instruments aboard the Cassini orbiter, reveal to curious planetary scientists that Titan's geological features include lakes and river channels filled with methane, ethane, and propane. Titan's strange surface also shows mountains and sand dunes--and it is pockmarked by craters. The rippling dunes form when fierce winds sweep up loose particles from the surface and then tosses them downwind. However, the sands of Titan are not like the sands on our Earth. Titan's "sand" is both bizarre and alien, probably composed of very small particles of solid hydrocarbons--or, possibly, ice imprisoned within hydrocarbons--with a density of about one-third that of the sand on our own planet. Furthermore, Titan's gravity is low. In fact, it is only approximately one-seventh that of Earth. This means that, working in combination with the low density of Titan's sand particles, they carry only the small weight of a mere four percent that of terrestrial sand. Titan's "sand" is about the same light-weight as freeze-dried grains of coffee!



Titan has three large hydrocarbon seas that are all located near its north pole, and they are surrounded by numerous smaller lakes in the northern hemisphere. Only one large lake has been detected in the southern hemisphere.



The team further ascertained the presence of the enormous, embedded lake by drawing a connection between processes seen on Europa and processes seen on our own planet. Ice-piercing radar, that can delve through thick layers of ice sheets, has been used to locate numerous subglacial lakes in Antarctica.