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Interesting facts about space.

The harmful effects of radiation are based both on its strength and the time of exposure to its source. Average human would need to spend nearly four months inside the Van Allen belts to accumulate a lethal dose. The astronauts managed to pass through them during less than one hour. Regarding the time spent out of Earth's magnetic field, where the astronauts were exposed to solar radiation, an average human could endure a radiation exposure equivalent to one-way trip to Mars and still not receive a dose which exceeds lifetime levels set up by NASA.



and here is another

Earth's Moon is our planet's closest neighbor in space, but it is remarkable how even neighbors can keep secrets from each other. For years, astronomers thought that Earth's Moon was barren of water and other volatile compounds, but this notion began to change in 2008, when a team of planetary scientists announced that they had discovered small quantities of water imprisoned within volcanic glass beads, that astronauts had carried back to Earth from the Apollo 13 and 17 missions to our Moon. In 2011, additional research revealed extremely tiny crystalline formations within those beads--indicating that they contained quantities of water similar to some basalts on Earth.



and finally

The February 2018 study, conducted by Carnegie and JPL astronomers, created detailed scenarios in order to determine whether existing theories about the catastrophic Giant Impact theory could explain a wet Moon that is still depleted in other volatile elements like sodium and potassium.

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Earth's lunar companion is thought to have been born about 4.51 billion years ago, according to a recent study. This means that our Moon was born soon after Earth's formation in the primeval Solar System. The average distance of Earth's Moon from our planet is about 238,900 miles--or approximately 1.28 light-seconds--and it is in synchronous rotation with Earth, always showing the same face, with the near side famous for its beautiful bewitching dark volcanic maria (Latin for seas) that are situated between prominent impact craters and the bright, very ancient, crustal highlands. Our Moon's surface is actually quite dark, even though it appears in the sky at night to be very bright, with a reflectance only a bit higher than that of old asphalt. The prominent position of our Moon in our planet's night sky, as well as its regular cycle of phases, have made our nearest and dearest celestial companion a valuable cultural influence since ancient times in art, mythology, language, and on calendars.



When a moon is in an orbit around its parent-planet, all is well--just as long as the gravity that is holding the moon together in one piece exceeds the powerful, relentless pull of its planet. Alas, if a moon wanders too close, and the tidal forces of the parent-planet exceed the gravitational bind of the unlucky moon, the moon will fall apart. This is termed the Roche limit. Earth's relatively large Moon is a very fortunate natural satellite, and the limit here is a bit under 10,000 kilometers--while our Moon is a safe 385,000 kilometers away from our planet.



Planetary scientists usually calculate the Moon's age by using the radioactive decay of elements like uranium, explained Dr. John Chambers in the April 2, 2014 National Geographic News. Dr. Chambers is a planetary scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C. By studying an element with a recognized decay rate, and knowing its concentration in Moon rocks or the Earth's surface, scientists are able to calculate back in time to when the material first formed. However, there are numerous and varying radioactive materials that can provide differing timelines, added Dr. Chambers, who was not involved in the study.