Black and White Dwarf Stars what does a black dwarf look like socratic and Stars White Dwarf Black

Black and White Dwarf Stars what does a black dwarf look like socratic and Stars White Dwarf Black

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Interesting facts about space.

Van Allen Radiation Belts. According to this widely known argument for the fake moon landing theory, the astronauts would not be able even to survive their trip after receiving a lethal dose of radiation, both from the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding the Earth and solar radiation beyond Earth's magnetic field.



and here is another

Kepler-22b's initial transit in front of the face of its fiery star was seen by Kepler on its third day of scientific observations, back in May 2009. The third passage was spotted in late 2010. Still more confirming evidence was provided by the infrared Spitzer Space Telescope, as well as by ground-based 'scopes. The confirmation of the existence of this interesting extrasolar planet world was announced on December 5, 2011.



and finally

The Burmese month of Kason (April/May), the second month of the Burmese year, has arrived and 'Kason la pyei', the Full-moon of Kason marks an important date for Burmese people, in general, and Burmese Buddhists, in particular. It is a month of commemoration and anticipation. Why this is so you will learn while reading this article.

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Now everything turns green and colourful, the air is cool and clear and people - especially, of course, children - are happily dancing in the first showers, also called 'Mango showers' as they bring forth the delicious mangoes which will soon be ripe and available in abundance. So, I hope you have enjoyed the celebration of the full-moon of Kason and have become familiar with what it is that makes this festival so full of meaning to the Burmese people. I suggest that we have a rest now because soon we will celebrate the next festival, the 'Full Moon of Waso' in the month of Waso (June/July) that marks the beginning of the 'Buddhist Lent.



Moons are natural satellites that orbit another body that, in turn, circles its parent-star. A moon is held in place by both its own gravity and the gravitational grip of its host planet. Some planets have moons; some do not. Several asteroids in our Solar System also are orbited by very small moons--and some dwarf planets, such as Pluto, also have moons. One of Pluto's five moons, Charon, is almost 50% the size of Pluto. For this reason, the two frozen worlds inhabiting our Solar System's remote twilight zone, are sometimes classified as a double-planet.



In addition to the Giant Impact theory, there are several other models that have been proposed to explain how our Moon was born. One alternative model to the Giant Impact scenario suggests that Earth's Moon was once a part of our planet that simply budded off when our Solar System was in its infancy--approximately 4.5 billion years ago. According to this model, the Pacific Ocean basin would be the most likely cradle for lunar birth. A second model proposes that our Moon was really born elsewhere in our Solar System and, like the duo of tiny potato-shaped Martian moons, was eventually snared by the gravitational tug of a major planet. A third theory postulates that both Earth and Moon were born at about the same time from the same protoplanetary accretion disk, composed of gas and dust, from which our Sun's family of planets, moons, and smaller objects ultimately emerged.