Black Holes Speed vortex around a black hole spins at 70 the speed of light Speed Holes Black

Black Holes Speed vortex around a black hole spins at 70 the speed of light Speed Holes Black

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Interesting facts about space.

The sunlight that penetrates through the transparent crust helps the growth of vegetation in the caves to a substantial extent. However sunlight is not the main light source in the caves. The types of vegetation found in the moon are markedly different from the ones on earth. The plants commonly seen in the caves are quite short and look very much like the miniature trees, bushes and shrubs grown using Japanese "Bonsai" techniques.



and here is another

Pluto itself is a relatively large denizen of the distant Kuiper Belt, that orbits our Sun in the frigid company of a vast multitude of other bewitching and mysterious icy objects. Like other Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), Pluto is thought to be composed primarily of ice and rock. It is an intriguing frozen "oddball", a mere 1/6 the mass of Earth's own Moon and 1/3 its volume. Pluto also has a highly inclined, eccentric orbit that carries it from 30 to 49 Astronomical Units (AU) from our Sun. One AU is equal to the mean Earth-Sun separation of 93,000,000 miles. As a result, Pluto periodically moves towards our Sun at a distance that is closer to our Star than Neptune. Very fortunately for both Neptune and Pluto, an orbital resonance with Neptune prevents the duo from crashing into each other.



and finally

Pluto has a tenuous atmosphere composed of nitrogen, methane, and extremely toxic carbon monoxide, which probably originates from the ice on its frigid surface. As Pluto wanders in its orbit ever closer and closer to our Sun, it becomes increasingly warmer and warmer. The ice on its strange surface evaporates as a result, and the gases flow into interplanetary space. This continues until Pluto starts to travel away from the Sun again, becoming increasingly colder and colder as it does so. Pluto's bizarre atmosphere again freezes, and then floats down to its very alien surface as snow--but it will evaporate again when Pluto begins its long journey back towards our Sun. It takes 248 years for the frozen dwarf planet to complete a single orbit around our Sun.

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The beautiful, banded, blue ice-giant planet, Neptune, is the furthest major planet from the Sun. It is also orbited by a very weird large moon that may not have been born a moon at all. The moon, Triton, is about 1,680 miles in diameter, and sports features that eerily resemble those found on the dwarf planet Pluto. Pluto is a denizen of the Kuiper Belt. The Kuiper Belt is a reservoir of comets and other icy bodies--some large, some small--that circle around our Sun beyond the orbit of Neptune, at a distance of about 30 to 55 Astronomical Units (AU) from our Star. One AU is equal to the average distance of Earth from the Sun--approximately 93,000,000 miles.



"This means that at the atomic level, the Earth and the Moon are identical. This new information challenged the giant impact theory for lunar formation," study lead author Dr. Seth Jacobson told Space.com on April 2, 2014. Dr. Jacobson is a planetary scientist at the Cote d'Azur Observatory in Nice, France.



Now, by pinpointing the precise birthday of the Moon, Dr. Jacobson and his team can help to explain why the Moon and our planet are so mysteriously similar in their compositions.