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Interesting facts about space.

For most of the 20th century, astronomers thought that Pluto was a lonely little world, a solitary ball of ice circling our Sun, so very far from the comforting warmth and delightful light of our brilliant Star. However, in 1992, the discovery of the first KBO (other than Pluto), made astronomers come to the realization that Pluto is not far from the madding crowd of a vast population of other Kuiper Belt ice balls.



and here is another

The Kuiper Belt is populated by mostly small, frigid objects, which are relics of our Solar System's formation 4.56 billion years ago. Most KBOs are primarily composed of frozen volatiles, such as water, methane, and ammonia. The Kuiper Belt is also the home of two other officially designated dwarf planets (in addition to Pluto): Haumea and Makemake. A few of our Solar System's moons, such as Saturn's Phoebe and Neptune's Triton, are also commonly thought to have been born in this distant and mysterious region.



and finally

"For decades scientists have thought Jupiter's moon Europa was a likely place for life, but now we have specific, exciting regions on the icy moon to focus our future studies, " Dr. Don Blankenship, senior research scientist at the University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics, commented in the November 16, 2011 National Geographic News.

More information:

"How can this be? Is it just a matter of size? Location? What about Mercury and Venus? Did they grow on similar timescales to the Earth or on timescales more similar to Mars? I think these are some of the really important questions that we, as a community of planetary scientists, will be addressing in the future," Dr. Jacobson told the press in April 2014.



Until 2004, no spacecraft had visited Saturn in over two decades. Pioneer 11 had snapped the very first close-up images of Saturn when it flew past in 1979, Voyager 1 had its rendezvous about a year later, and in August 1981 Voyager 2 had its brief but highly productive encounter. At last, on July 1, 2004, NASA's Cassini spacecraft went into orbit around Saturn, and started taking breathtaking photographs.



Do you know the name of the lunar module used in Apollo 11? Its name was "Eagle"; named after the United States national bird. The name "Columbia" was chosen for the larger command module.