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Interesting facts about space.

The mass distribution of the moons of Neptune is lopsided. In fact, it is the most lopsided satellite system of any of the giant planets dwelling in our Solar System. Triton accounts for nearly all the mass of the system, with all of the other moons together accounting for only one-third of 1%. This is very similar to the system of moons that circle the ringed-planet Saturn, where the large, smoggy, orange moon Titan--the second-largest moon in our Sun's family (after Ganymede of Jupiter)--accounts for over 95% of the total mass of Saturn's system of moons.



and here is another

Multiple Light Sources. On the moon, there is only one light source sufficiently strong to form shadows; the Sun. So it is solid to suggest that all shadows on the Moon should run parallel to each other. However, this was apparently not the case during the moon landing.



and finally

During the entire Apollo program, the Soviet Union closely monitored all the transmissions of the astronauts. They would have been absolutely delighted to find it was a hoax. It would have been the greatest propaganda coup of all time. But apparently, the Soviets also didn't find any solid evidence of faked moon landings.

More information:

Methane and nitrogen present in Titan's atmosphere react together to create a variety of organic materials. Many planetary scientists think the heaviest materials somersault down to the surface of hydrocarbon-slashed Titan. Dr. Le Gall and her team propose that when those compounds splash into the sea, either by directly falling from the air as hydrocarbon rain, or through Titan's rivers, some are dissolved in the liquid methane. The compounds that do not dissolve, such as nitrites and benzene, sink down into the floor of this exotic sea.



In the fourth century BCE, Aristotle recorded that Mars vanished behind Earth's Moon during an occultation. This suggested that the planet was farther away than our Moon. The Greek astronomer, Ptolemy, who lived in Alexandria, attempted to solve the problem of the orbital motion of the Red Planet. Ptolemy's collective works and model on astronomy was presented in his multi-volume collection, titled the Almagest. The Almagest became the authoritative work on Western astronomy for the next 400 years. Ancient Chinese astronomers were also aware of the existence of Mars by no later than the fourth century BCE. In the fifth century CE, the Indian astronomical work titled Surya Siddhanta proposed a measurement of the estimated diameter of Mars. In East Asian cultures, Mars is usually referred to as the "fire star"--based on the Five Elements: fire, wood, metal, water, and earth.



The more widely accepted theory that the planets and regular moons formed together from the same swirling cloud of gas and dust, works well as an explanation for the larger moons of our Solar System, such as the four Galilean moons--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--orbiting the giant planet Jupiter. However, the multitude of smaller moons, swarming around the giant planets, "have so far been considered a by-product," Dr. Crida commented in the November 29, 2012 Scientific American.