Dinousaur Asteroid Earth Collision collision of asteroid bigger than dinosaur killer may Asteroid Earth Dinousaur Collision

Dinousaur Asteroid Earth Collision collision of asteroid bigger than dinosaur killer may Asteroid Earth Dinousaur Collision

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Interesting facts about space.

They are prominent in the shallow coastal waters of estuaries and harbors which explains their abundance in what is still an infant branch within the larger saltwater aquarium trade industry. Because they are common in both temperate and tropical waters, they can tolerate temperature ranges anywhere between 42-88 F (6-31 C). Although they can survive in brackish water, a salinity level (specific gravity) of 1.023 will mimic their native marine environment.



and here is another

In nature, moon jellies spend most of their time drifting on currents rather that swimming. In captivity, they will require an aquarium with a well designed turbulence system to keep them from becoming a helpless ball of gelatinous goo at the bottom of your tank.



and finally

When these photos were taken, it was full daylight on the Moon. Because there is only an extremely thin atmosphere on the Moon,the sky appears black. In addition, sunlight at the Moon's surface was incomparably strong with the starlight; the stars simply faded in comparison with the sun. If the astronauts used sufficiently long exposures, stars would, indeed, be visible.

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In 2010 and 2011, the French astrophysicists devised their model to explain how the moons of Saturn were born. They based their findings on data derived from the Cassini probe--that is investigating the Saturn-system--and on numerical simulations. The team found that Saturn's bewitching rings, which are slender disks composed of tiny chunks of gleaming ice surrounding the giant planet, gave rise to the icy moons. This happened because the rings spread as time went by--and when the rings attained a critical distance from the planet (termed the Roche limit), their ends melded together and created small worldlets that broke off and floated away. In this way the rings created the icy moons orbiting Saturn.



Therefore, the planetary ring-spreading model can explain how the majority of regular moons were born in our Solar System.



Such moon-forming mergers and collisions are not unheard of. For example, the leading theory explaining the formation of Earth's own large Moon, suggests that it was born about 4.5 billion years ago when a Mars-sized protoplanet, dubbed Theia by astronomers, collided with our planet. Just as our Moon is identical geologically to Earth's mantle, the six medium-sized icy sister moons of Saturn are all similar in composition to Titan's icy mantle, the researchers announced in October 2012.