Edwin Hubble’s Sister big bang theory timeline timeline timetoast timelines Sister Edwin Hubble’s

Edwin Hubbles Sister big bang theory timeline timeline timetoast timelines Sister Edwin Hubbles

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Interesting facts about space.

Numerical simulations have been conducted that show that there is a 0.41 probability that Neptune's moon Halimede blasted into Nereid in the past. Even though it is not known if this collision really did occur, both moons display similar grey colors. This implies that Halimede could be a chunk of Nereid that broke off during the collision.



and here is another

Multiple Light Sources. On the moon, there is only one light source sufficiently strong to form shadows; the Sun. So it is solid to suggest that all shadows on the Moon should run parallel to each other. However, this was apparently not the case during the moon landing.



and finally

Moons are enchanting, mesmerizing objects dwelling in their orbits around planets both within and beyond our Solar System. Earth's own large Moon, a silver-golden world that shines in our starlit night sky with the reflected fires of our Star, the Sun, has long been the inspiration of haunting poems and tales of love, as well as myths of magic and madness. Most of the moons of our Sun's own bewitching family are glistening little icy worlds in orbit around the giant planets of the outer Solar System. In June 2013, astronomers announced their dedicated hunt for a habitable moon-world beyond our Sun's family, circling around the planet Kepler-22b, that dwells in the faraway family of a different star.

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In 2006, NASA dispatched the New Horizons spacecraft to visit the outer limits of our Solar System--the Kuiper Belt where the dwarf planet Pluto dwells, along with trillions of icy comets, and a multitude of other larger icy bodies--and where it is thought that the adopted moon Triton was born. The spacecraft will reach this mysterious and unexplored region in July 2015, when it flies by the icy dwarf planet and its moons--including the large moon Charon. New Horizons will shed light on the weird worlds and bizarre objects dwelling in the outskirts of our Solar System.



Until 1610, when Galileo Galilei discovered the quartet of large Galilean moons orbiting Jupiter--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--Earth's Moon was the Moon, because it was the only moon known to exist. Now, we know differently. There are over 100 known moons in our Solar System alone, and probably many, many more, circling distant alien planets belonging to the families of stars beyond our Sun. Most of the moons in our own Solar System are relatively small, icy worldlets that contain only small amounts of rocky material. The faraway multitude of sparkling, frozen moons that inhabit our Sun's family are mostly found circling the quartet of outer gaseous giant planets--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In this dimly lit region, far from our Star's heat and light, these tiny icy moons perform a strange and lovely ballet around their large, gaseous host planets. The quartet of giant gaseous planets, that inhabit our Solar System's outer suburbs, are enshrouded by heavy atmospheres of gas, and they are accompanied in their travels around our Sun, by their own orbiting entourage of moons and moonlets.



Mars may be circled by many moons smaller than 160 to 330 feet in diameter, and a ring of dust has been predicted to circle Mars between Phobos and Deimos.