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Interesting facts about space.

The Kuiper Belt, sometimes called the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt, is a region located in our Solar System's outer limits beyond the realm of the eight major planets. It extends from the orbit of Neptune to approximately 50 AU. Neptune's average distance from our Sun is about 30.1 AU--its perihelion is 29.8 AU, while its aphelion is 30.4 AU.



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Neptune, the eighth major planet from the Sun, and its neighboring sister-planet, Uranus--the seventh planet from the Sun--are both classified as ice-giants because their large cores are icy, and they never managed to acquire the immense gaseous envelopes of the two true gas-giants, Jupiter and Saturn. The gas giants are possibly composed entirely of gas and liquid, although they may have small solid cores. In contrast, the ice-giants have large solid cores and thinner atmospheres. The two gas-giants, being mostly atmosphere, are very lightweight for their size. Saturn is the lightest planet in our Solar System, despite its immense diameter. In fact, Saturn is light enough to float like a huge raft in water, provided there was an ocean big enough for it to bob around in.



and finally

In addition to the Giant Impact theory, there are several other models that have been proposed to explain how our Moon was born. One alternative model to the Giant Impact scenario suggests that Earth's Moon was once a part of our planet that simply budded off when our Solar System was in its infancy--approximately 4.5 billion years ago. According to this model, the Pacific Ocean basin would be the most likely cradle for lunar birth. A second model proposes that our Moon was really born elsewhere in our Solar System and, like the duo of tiny potato-shaped Martian moons, was eventually snared by the gravitational tug of a major planet. A third theory postulates that both Earth and Moon were born at about the same time from the same protoplanetary accretion disk, composed of gas and dust, from which our Sun's family of planets, moons, and smaller objects ultimately emerged.

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The relatively light regions of the Moon are known as the highlands. The dark features, the lunar maria, are impact basins that were later filled with lava between 4.2 and 1.2 million years ago. These light and dark regions were created by rocks of different ages and compositions. This provides evidence for how the ancient crust may have crystallized from a global lunar ocean of magma. The impact craters have been preserved for billions of years, and they provide observers with an impact history for our Moon and other bodies that inhabit the inner Solar System.



Our Earth basks comfortably in the sunny, warmer, inner regions of our Solar System, and our Moon is the largest one of its kind, in this region, relatively close to our Star. Of the four rocky, terrestrial planets--of which our Earth is a member--Mercury and Venus are moonless, and Mars sports two small, misshapen little rocky moons, Phobos and Deimos, that are likely captured refugees from the main asteroid belt that circles our Sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.



"I think the best thing about this work is that they explain this link between the mass of the moon and the orbital distance, which was known before but not understood," said planetary scientist, Dr. David Nesvorny, in the November 29, 2012 Scientific American. Dr. Nesvorny, of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, who did not contribute to the new research, added that "If you had asked me a few years ago, I would think of our Moon's formation and the formation of the satellites of the outer planets differently. This puts things on common ground."