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Interesting facts about space.

The Kuiper Belt, sometimes called the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt, is a region located in our Solar System's outer limits beyond the realm of the eight major planets. It extends from the orbit of Neptune to approximately 50 AU. Neptune's average distance from our Sun is about 30.1 AU--its perihelion is 29.8 AU, while its aphelion is 30.4 AU.



and here is another

No Satellite Pictures. Even with all of our telescopes on Earth and the incredibly powerful Hubble Telescope, none of them has ever taken any pictures with any of the landing sites of the Moon. This often misleads us to the thought: are they really out there?



and finally

The inner Solar System is dramatically different from the distant realm of the giant planets. The inner region of our Solar System, where our Earth is situated, is almost entirely moon-less. Of the four relatively small, rocky worlds--Mercury, Venus, our Earth, and Mars--Mercury and Venus are barren of moons, and Mars is orbited by two fascinating, but very small, potato-shaped moons named Phobos and Deimos. The duo of Martian moons are often considered to be captured asteroids that long ago escaped from their birthplace in the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter. According to this scenario, Phobos and Deimos, during their dangerous journey from their original home, were snared by the gravity of their adopted Red Planet when our 4.56 billion-year-old Solar System was young. In the warm and well-lit inner Solar System, only Earth's large Moon is a significant moon-world in its own right.

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The research published in the July 4, 2016 issue of Nature Geoscience highlights the main factor differentiating moon-birth around Mars and Earth: the differing rotation speeds of the two planets prompted "completely different tidal actions," Dr. Charnoz explained in the July 4, 2016 CNRS Press Release. Dr. Charnoz proposes that at the time of their respective impacts, "Earth took less than four hours to spin on its axis whereas Mars rotated very slowly over a 24-hour period." The result of this important difference caused Earth to hold on to its single, large Moon, while the Martian collision created a dozen smaller moons alongside a larger moon. As time went by, Martian tidal action--resulting from the planet's slow rotation rate--caused most of the moons, including the largest one, to crash back down to the surface of their parent-planet. As a result, only the two most distant moons, Phobos and Deimos, survived as testimony to the ancient catastrophe.



Icy moons and tumbling, gleaming moonlets dance around within the lovely and very famous rings of the gas-giant planet Saturn. A study released in November 2012 now suggests that most of the moons inhabiting our own Solar System were born from ancient, primordial Saturn-like ring systems that swirled around newborn planets circling the young Sun. According to this study, most of our Solar System's regular satellites--which are those moons that lovingly embrace their parent planets in approximately equatorial orbits--formed in this way. In contrast, the most popular theory explaining moon-formation, suggests that moons emerged simultaneously with their parent planets, as a direct consequence of planetary formation.



All New to Mother Earth. This new belt of cosmos that the Sun is going through is all new to Mother Earth. This yearly trek is not the same as last year's. It is quite an adventure, full of surprises, for her to adapt and of course for us as her inhabitants to adjust as well.