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Full View of the Planet Mars planet mars rotating in space full mars planet spinning Planet Full Mars the View of

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Interesting facts about space.

Numerical simulations have been conducted that show that there is a 0.41 probability that Neptune's moon Halimede blasted into Nereid in the past. Even though it is not known if this collision really did occur, both moons display similar grey colors. This implies that Halimede could be a chunk of Nereid that broke off during the collision.



and here is another

Some studies which have been performed in certain cities within the United States show that there is no correlation between the full moon phase and such things as a rise in suicides, crime rate, dog bites or births. And yet, other studies completed by such individuals as psychologists and other human behaviorists have shown that there is, in fact, a peak in certain kinds of behavior associated with a loss of contact with reality during full moons. These include murder, arson, dangerous driving and kleptomania, which is an irresistible impulse to steal due to an emotional rather than economical need.



and finally

It is true that even our most powerful telescopes aimed at the landing sites wouldn't see anything. However, not because the Moon landings didn't happen. It is only because of the optical limitations of telescopes themselves, because of their limited size and distance from the Moon.

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Some of the images focus on the shallow center of a bizarre impact crater dubbed Pwyll. Impact rays and shattered pieces of material scattered over an immense area of the moon tell the tale of a sizeable meteorite that collided violently with Europa relatively recently--"only" about 10 to 100 million years ago. There is also darker debris chaotically scattered around Pwyll. This further suggests that the large crashing meteorite may have dug up some deeply buried material, and tossed it helter-skelter around the crater.



The current study's Franco-Belgian-Japanese collaboration looks forward to this mission. JAXA plans to enlist them to conduct tests on the Martian samples when they are returned to Earth. The samples will help the scientists determine whether Phobos is indeed made up of a mixture of Martian mantle and debris left in the wake of the tragic crash of the doomed, vanished protoplanet--as suggested by their supercomputer simulations.



According to the new theory, moon-formation starts at the very edge of a planetary ring, where a fragile baby moon can begin to emerge without the danger of being ripped apart by the fierce gravity of its parent planet. These dancing little moonlets, formed from ring-material, then travel outward. As the ring-system continually produces moonlet after moonlet after moonlet, the small icy worlds coalesce to form increasingly larger moons. The larger moons, in turn, may also merge together, as they dance outward from their parent planet.