Galileo Solar System Project the galileo project party invitations ideas Galileo System Solar Project

Galileo Solar System Project the galileo project party invitations ideas Galileo System Solar Project

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Interesting facts about space.

To make the flag stand still on the moon, the flag was actually made from plastic material, similar to the one that tents are usually made of. For practical reasons, the flag was originally folded to maximize space and stored in a thin tube. After Neil Armstrong planted it to the surface of the Moon, it briefly appeared to move as it was unfolding itself to its final shape.



and here is another

NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft was the first to visit Titan back in 1980. Although Voyager 1 made a truly heroic journey, it proved unsuccessful in its efforts to obtain close-up pictures of Titan's veiled surface. This adventurous, early space mission was not able to obtain the desired images because it could not cut through the dense orange smog--and the resulting images showed only some minor brightness and color variations in Titan's atmosphere. In 1994, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) did succeed in obtaining some precious and revealing images of Titan's well-hidden surface--showing the existence of a bright and sparkling continent dubbed Xanadu--after the "Xanadu" of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's romantic poem Kubla Khan. Titan's Xanadu glitters as if lit by the cold fires of a multitude of sparkling rhinestones.



and finally

There are several potential explanations that could account for the sea's composition of pure methane, Dr. Le Gall added. "Either Ligeia Mare is replenished by fresh methane rainfall, or something is removing ethane from it. It is possible that the ethane ends up in the undersea crust, or that it somehow flows into the adjacent sea, Kraken Mare, but that will require further investigation," she noted.

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In order to do precisely that, Dr. Li and Dr. Milliken used laboratory-based measurements of samples returned from the Apollo missions, combined with a detailed temperature profile of the areas of interest on the lunar surface. Using the new thermal correction, the two astronomers studied the data derived from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper, which is an imaging spectrometer that was carried aboard India's Chandrayaan-1 lunar orbiter.



Planetary scientists usually calculate the Moon's age by using the radioactive decay of elements like uranium, explained Dr. John Chambers in the April 2, 2014 National Geographic News. Dr. Chambers is a planetary scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C. By studying an element with a recognized decay rate, and knowing its concentration in Moon rocks or the Earth's surface, scientists are able to calculate back in time to when the material first formed. However, there are numerous and varying radioactive materials that can provide differing timelines, added Dr. Chambers, who was not involved in the study.



Earlier research had determined the quantity of material accreted onto the ancient Earth following the Moon-forming collision. These previous calculations were based on how the siderophile or "iron-loving" elements such as platinum and iridium show a strong tendency to wander down into our planet's core. Following each giant impact that the primordial Earth experienced, these elements would have leached from Earth's mantle and bonded with iron-rich, heavy material that was destined to travel down, down, down into our planet's heart.