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A little interesting about space life.

Soon after it had been snared by Neptune, Triton's orbit was highly eccentric. This indicates that Triton's capture would have caused a mess of chaotic perturbations in the orbits of the original inner moons of Neptune--thus causing them to crash into one another, producing a disk of rubble created from these catastrophic smash-ups. For this reason, it is probable that Neptune's current inner moons are not the original generation of moons that formed along with Neptune.



and here is another

Numerical simulations have been conducted that show that there is a 0.41 probability that Neptune's moon Halimede blasted into Nereid in the past. Even though it is not known if this collision really did occur, both moons display similar grey colors. This implies that Halimede could be a chunk of Nereid that broke off during the collision.



and finally

In order to spot such a remote exomoon, the authors of this new study, The Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler (HEK): III. The First Search for an Exomoon around a Habitable-Zone Planet, used a technique that models the dips and features of the parent star's light-curve (stellar brightness vs. time), which are caused by transits of the planet (and any accompanying moons) in front of the face of its star. This is a complicated and difficult endeavor because numerous and diverse models of planet-moon dynamics must be taken into consideration. Each one of these models possesses parameters that describe physical properties belonging to the planet or moon, as well as parameters describing the orbital system. The authors use what is termed Bayesian statistics to account for the fact that the true orbital model of this planetary system is still not known--and this enables them to calculate if a model with our without a moon fits the observed light-curve the best.

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Our Moon is Earth's only permanent natural satellite. It is also the largest planetary satellite in our Solar System relative to the size of its parent-planet. After Jupiter's volcanic Galilean moon, Io, Earth's Moon is the densest natural satellite among those whose densities have been determined.



Two French astrophysicists, proposing the new, alternative scenario explaining moon-birth, reported their findings in a paper titled: Formation of Regular Satellites from Ancient Massive Rings in the Solar System, published in the November 30, 2012 issue of the journal Science. Dr. Aurelien Crida, an astrophysicist at the University of Nice--Sophia Antipolis and the Observatory of Cote d'Azur in France, explained in the November 29, 2012 issue of Scientific American that "It's fundamentally the same process that gave birth to the Moon and to the satellites of the giant planets, and that's the spreading of rings." Dr. Crida is a co-author of the study with Dr. Sebastien Charnoz of the University of Paris--Diderot.



If you were to take an Apollo 11 quiz in school, you would likely find that one of the main focuses is the fact that it was the first mission to carry humans to the moon. It was on this voyage that the famous words, "That's one small step for man; one giant leap for mankind," were uttered by Neil Armstrong as he became the first human being to ever set foot on the moon.