Hubble Telescope Glass mirror of the hubble space telescope 1980s at science Glass Telescope Hubble

Hubble Telescope Glass mirror of the hubble space telescope 1980s at science Glass Telescope Hubble

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A little interesting about space life.

It may be known fact that there is moon influence onto the tidal waves of the sea but it is never logic to make it applicable on human body. Those who claim this support their saying with the point that human body is mostly occupied by water hence the force should affect human's behavior as well. This is erroneous and has no scientific proofs. A valid explanation is that the moon affects the Earth's unbounded collection of water surface but water in the human body is completely covered, it is totally ridiculous to say the moon can direct the force through the skin into the body then impinge on the human's individual character.



and here is another

The HST images also showed that the moon Kerberos is charcoal black in color, which is in stark contrast to the brilliant white of the other moons of Pluto. It was predicted that dust blasted off the moons by meteorite impacts would blanket the moons, giving them a homogeneous appearance. However, the reason why Kerberos is black remains a mystery.



and finally

The most detailed pictures of Europa show even more intriguing clues that there is slush lurking beneath its brightly shining icy surface. Slightly smaller than Earth's own beloved Moon, Europa's surface temperature could easily freeze an ocean solid over a span of only several million years. However, some astronomers think that warmth from a game of tidal tug-of-war between Europa and Jupiter, as well as other neighboring moons, could be keeping large regions of Europa's subsurface global ocean in a life-friendly liquid state. This process is termed tidal heating, and it refers to a mechanism whereby the gravitational tugs of a nearby object (or objects) flex and bend and contract and expand another object continually. This constant churning causes the victimized object, in this case Europa, to heat up and be considerably more balmy than its great distance from the Sun would otherwise allow it to be.

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Images of Europa taken by Galileo in 1997 provide some important evidence suggesting that Europa may be slushy just beneath its glistening cracked icy crust--and possibly even warmer at greater depths. This evidence includes an oddly shallow impact crater, chunky-looking textured blocks of surface material that tantalizingly resemble icebergs on Earth, and openings in the surface where new icy crust appears to have formed between continent-sized plates of ice.



The astronomer Tycho Brahe, during the 17th century, measured the diurnal parallax of Mars that Johannes Kepler had used in order to make a preliminary calculation of the relative distance to the Red Planet. When the earliest telescopes to be used for astronomical purposes finally became available, the diurnal parallax of Mars was measured again in an attempt to determine the distance between our Sun and Earth. Giovanni Domenico Cassini was the first to make this measurement in 1692--but the early parallax measurements were hindered by the primitive quality of the instruments. The only occultation of Mars by the planet Venus was observed on October 13, 1590, by Michael Maestlin at Heidelberg. In 1610, Mars was viewed by the great astronomer Galileo Galilei, who was the first to make use of a primitive telescope for astronomical purposes. The Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens was the first to draw a map of Mars that showed terrain features.



Another interesting piece of Apollo 11 trivia is the fact that the Apollo missions had actually been ongoing and this was actually the fifth mission of Project Apollo that involved human spaceflight. Aside from that, it was also the third voyage by humans to the moon; however, no human had ever stepped foot on the moon until this specific voyage.