Hubble Telescope Glass nasa spacecraft hubble telescope glass cube laser etched Hubble Glass Telescope

Hubble Telescope Glass nasa spacecraft hubble telescope glass cube laser etched Hubble Glass Telescope

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A little interesting about space life.

The name moon jellyfish is purely descriptive. They are named for the most prominent part of their anatomical makeup, their large disk or full moon shaped bell. They can be further distinguished by the four horseshoe-shaped gonads at the center of their bell. These reproductive organs resemble the craters found on the moon. These fish are very popular as pets because they are transparent and will appear to glow in whatever color is shined through them. They look particularly stunning in an aquarium with an LED fader system set up in it. Another point in their favor is that their stinging cells do not produce enough pressure to pierce human skin. In the wild, a moon jelly's life cycle is limited to one year form start to finish. In captivity they can easily live up to three years. These jellies can grow up to one foot in diameter.



and here is another

There is also a famous farmer's manual called the Maine Farmers Almanac, which was used to record the weather and moon phases. The first full moon of the month was recorded in red on the due date and the second full moon of the month, recorded in blue. This could be the first modern day origin of the term. When there are two full moons within a calendar month, in modern times the second full moon of the month is referred to by meteorologists and astronomers as a blue moon. This only occurs once every 33 months. Not that rare really. The last one was in July 2004 and the next after today's will not grace us with its presence until December 2009. Hence the term, "Once In a Blue Moon".



and finally

Europa, is a fascinating, frigid little world. It is one of the four Galilean moons, discovered in January 1610 by the great Galileo Galilei when he was gazing up into the night sky with his small, primitive "spyglass". The other Galilean moons, the weird sisters of Europa, are Io, Ganymede, and Callisto.

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Earth's Moon is a brilliant, beguiling, bewitching companion world. The largest and brightest object in our planet's night sky, it has for eons been the source of wild magical tales, myths, and poetry--as well as an ancient symbol for romantic love. Some traditional tales tell of a man's face etched on its bright surface, while still others whisper haunting childhood stories of a "Moon Rabbit". Lovely, ancient, and fantastic stories aside, Earth's Moon is a real object, a large rocky sphere that has been with our planet almost from the very beginning, when our Solar System was first forming over four billion years ago. But where did Earth's Moon come from? In April 2014, a team of planetary scientists announced that they had pinned down the birth date of the Moon to within 100 million years of the formation of our Solar System, and this new discovery indicates that Earth's Moon was most likely born about 4.47 billion years ago in a gigantic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth.



In addition, this new study weakens certain theories that some planetary scientists suggest as explanations for the formation of other rocky, terrestrial planets like Venus and Mars, Dr. Jacobson believes.



In 2010 and 2011, the French astrophysicists devised their model to explain how the moons of Saturn were born. They based their findings on data derived from the Cassini probe--that is investigating the Saturn-system--and on numerical simulations. The team found that Saturn's bewitching rings, which are slender disks composed of tiny chunks of gleaming ice surrounding the giant planet, gave rise to the icy moons. This happened because the rings spread as time went by--and when the rings attained a critical distance from the planet (termed the Roche limit), their ends melded together and created small worldlets that broke off and floated away. In this way the rings created the icy moons orbiting Saturn.