Hubble Telescope Glass nasa spacecraft hubble telescope glass cube laser etched Hubble Telescope Glass

Hubble Telescope Glass nasa spacecraft hubble telescope glass cube laser etched Hubble Telescope Glass

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A little interesting about space life.

Numerical simulations have been conducted that show that there is a 0.41 probability that Neptune's moon Halimede blasted into Nereid in the past. Even though it is not known if this collision really did occur, both moons display similar grey colors. This implies that Halimede could be a chunk of Nereid that broke off during the collision.



and here is another

During the entire Apollo program, the Soviet Union closely monitored all the transmissions of the astronauts. They would have been absolutely delighted to find it was a hoax. It would have been the greatest propaganda coup of all time. But apparently, the Soviets also didn't find any solid evidence of faked moon landings.



and finally

Gravity can pull binary systems apart when the sister objects travel too close to a massive body--such as the planet Neptune. The orbital motions of the two sister objects results in one member traveling slower than the other. This can disrupt the system and permanently alter the orbital companion. This mechanism is termed an exchange reaction, and it could have shot Triton into a number of different orbits around Neptune, Agnor continued.

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Earth's Moon is the fifth largest moon in our Solar System, and the only world beyond our own that we have walked upon, leaving our footprints behind in moon dust as a silent testimony that once we existed, and had been there. Our Moon is both the brightest and largest object in Earth's night sky, and many astronomers think that our bewitching lunar companion was born as a result of an ancient collision between our planet and an ill-fated Mars-sized protoplanet that has been named Theia. There are other theories that have been devised to explain our Moon's origin, but the Giant Impact theory is considered to be the best explanation. When the doomed Theia blasted into the primordial Earth, it launched into the sky above our planet the debris resulting from that catastrophic crash. The debris eventually coalesced into Earth's Moon.



The inner Solar System is dramatically different from the distant realm of the giant planets. The inner region of our Solar System, where our Earth is situated, is almost entirely moon-less. Of the four relatively small, rocky worlds--Mercury, Venus, our Earth, and Mars--Mercury and Venus are barren of moons, and Mars is orbited by two fascinating, but very small, potato-shaped moons named Phobos and Deimos. The duo of Martian moons are often considered to be captured asteroids that long ago escaped from their birthplace in the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter. According to this scenario, Phobos and Deimos, during their dangerous journey from their original home, were snared by the gravity of their adopted Red Planet when our 4.56 billion-year-old Solar System was young. In the warm and well-lit inner Solar System, only Earth's large Moon is a significant moon-world in its own right.



The most popular theory of lunar formation suggests that the Moon was born in a monumental collision between a Mars-size object named Theia and the ancient Earth--and that this ancient smash-up would have melted our primordial planet. This model further suggests that more than 40 percent of Earth's Moon is composed of the debris of the tragedy that was Theia. However, more recent theories indicate that our planet suffered from several giant collisions during its formation, with the lunar-forming crash being the last great grand finale event.