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A little interesting about space life.

However, if we look closely on the original moon landing footage, we can see that the flag is actually standing still, and not moving in any way during the entire tape. But why is the flag still?



and here is another

Multiple Light Sources. On the moon, there is only one light source sufficiently strong to form shadows; the Sun. So it is solid to suggest that all shadows on the Moon should run parallel to each other. However, this was apparently not the case during the moon landing.



and finally

Gravity can pull binary systems apart when the sister objects travel too close to a massive body--such as the planet Neptune. The orbital motions of the two sister objects results in one member traveling slower than the other. This can disrupt the system and permanently alter the orbital companion. This mechanism is termed an exchange reaction, and it could have shot Triton into a number of different orbits around Neptune, Agnor continued.

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The new study is based on data gathered by Cassini's radar instrument during flybys of Titan between 2007 and 2015.



"This is still very much an area of active research, so there is much that scientists including our Department of Terrestrial Magnetism staff scientist Erik Hauri, as well as many other Carnegie colleagues and alumni, are figuring out about how much water exists on the Moon. This is a highly important and challenging question to answer given that we have limited knowledge on the history and distribution of lunar water," explained Dr. Miki Nakajima in a February 26, 2018 Carnegie Institution Press Release. Dr. Nakajima, who is of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (D.C.), along with California Institute of Technology's (Caltech's) Dr. David Stevenson, set out to determine whether prevailing lunar formation models need to be adjusted to explain more recent higher estimates of the quantity of water on Earth's Moon. Caltech is in Pasadena.



He added that "In our model for the Saturn system, we propose that Titan grew in a couple of giant impacts, each one combining the masses of the colliding bodies, while shedding a small family of middle-sized moons."