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A little interesting about space life.

Kepler-22b sports an orbital period of approximately 200 days. Its inclination is about 90 degrees, and it transits in front of the face of its star as observed by Earth-based astronomers. The shape of Kepler-22b's orbit is unknown, but it is known that its average orbital distance is well within its parent star's habitable zone. Many extrasolar planets are known to sport highly elliptical (football-shaped) orbits, and if Kepler-22b also travels along such a path around its star, it would only spend a tiny fraction of its time within this Goldilocks zone. This would cause the planet to undergo such extreme variations in temperature that it would not be a pleasant place for delicate living things to evolve and flourish. Kepler-22b is approximately 2.4 times the radius of Earth.



and here is another

The most detailed pictures of Europa show even more intriguing clues that there is slush lurking beneath its brightly shining icy surface. Slightly smaller than Earth's own beloved Moon, Europa's surface temperature could easily freeze an ocean solid over a span of only several million years. However, some astronomers think that warmth from a game of tidal tug-of-war between Europa and Jupiter, as well as other neighboring moons, could be keeping large regions of Europa's subsurface global ocean in a life-friendly liquid state. This process is termed tidal heating, and it refers to a mechanism whereby the gravitational tugs of a nearby object (or objects) flex and bend and contract and expand another object continually. This constant churning causes the victimized object, in this case Europa, to heat up and be considerably more balmy than its great distance from the Sun would otherwise allow it to be.



and finally

Mysterious and enticing--a true Wonderland world--Mars has sung its scientific siren's song for years to those who seek to understand its many long-held secrets. This small, rocky world with an intriguing red hue, gets its rusty color from the large amount of iron oxide that coats its surface. Much of this small world's charm comes from its reputation of being the happy abode of "little green men"--Earth's neighboring planet that plays host to life as we know it. However, Mars has many captivating features and bewitching mysteries, in addition to the somewhat dated idea that it is the most likely world in our Solar System--other than our Earth--to host living creatures. The duo of small potato-shaped Martian moons, Phobos and Deimos, are frequently considered to be captured asteroids that the Red Planet's gravity snared when they were making an ancient and unfortunate journey through interplanetary space from their place of birth in the Main Asteroid Belt, located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. The duo of rocky objects now circle their adopted parent-planet--at least, for the time being. However, in July 2016, a team of astronomers proposed an alternative viewpoint, suggesting that the two little moons were born from an ancient impact on the Martian surface by a crashing primordial object--along with many other now long-lost little moons.

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Several theories have been around for a long time that have attempted to explain how Earth's Moon was born. The first theory suggests that the Moon was once part of Earth, and that it somehow budded off about 4.5 billion years ago. According to this theory, the Pacific Ocean basin is the most likely site for where this occurred. A second theory postulates that the interaction of Sun-orbiting and Earth-orbiting planetesimals (the ancient building-blocks of planets), in the early years of our Solar System, caused them to disintegrate. Earth's Moon then coalesced out of the shattered debris of the pulverized planetesimals. A third theory proposes that the Earth and Moon were born together out of the original nebula that gave rise to our Solar System, and a fourth theory suggests that the Moon was really born somewhere else in our Solar System, and was ultimately captured by Earth's gravity when it traveled too close.



Earlier research had determined the quantity of material accreted onto the ancient Earth following the Moon-forming collision. These previous calculations were based on how the siderophile or "iron-loving" elements such as platinum and iridium show a strong tendency to wander down into our planet's core. Following each giant impact that the primordial Earth experienced, these elements would have leached from Earth's mantle and bonded with iron-rich, heavy material that was destined to travel down, down, down into our planet's heart.



A moon is a natural body that orbits a planet, and is held in its orbit by the force of both the host planet's gravity and the gravity of the moon itself. Some planets sport moons; some do not. Most of the moons dwelling in our Solar System are frigid (and sometimes weird) little worlds, made up of ice and rock, that swarm around the outer giant, gaseous planets of our Sun's bewitching family--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. One example of such bewitching weirdness is the frozen, little icy moon Hyperion, of the ringed-planet Saturn, that looks like an icy natural sponge.