NASA Emergency Response Teams emergency response team sharpens edge through adaptation Response Teams Emergency NASA

NASA Emergency Response Teams emergency response team sharpens edge through adaptation Response Teams Emergency NASA

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A little interesting about space life.

The entire cave dwelling system is made up of a very large number of cities. Neither money nor other form of currency is used among the moon people. There is no need to use money due to the way the community is structured to operate. Neither food nor other commonly used or consumable items belong to anyone specifically but to all the people, as was also set out in the well-known speech by the Native American or Red Indian Chief "Seattle" of America.



and here is another

Pluto has a tenuous atmosphere composed of nitrogen, methane, and extremely toxic carbon monoxide, which probably originates from the ice on its frigid surface. As Pluto wanders in its orbit ever closer and closer to our Sun, it becomes increasingly warmer and warmer. The ice on its strange surface evaporates as a result, and the gases flow into interplanetary space. This continues until Pluto starts to travel away from the Sun again, becoming increasingly colder and colder as it does so. Pluto's bizarre atmosphere again freezes, and then floats down to its very alien surface as snow--but it will evaporate again when Pluto begins its long journey back towards our Sun. It takes 248 years for the frozen dwarf planet to complete a single orbit around our Sun.



and finally

On July 20, 1969, during one of the defining moments of the human history, Neil Armstrong became the first man to step on the surface of Earth's Moon. In his own words, it was truly "one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind."

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However, if we look closely on the original moon landing footage, we can see that the flag is actually standing still, and not moving in any way during the entire tape. But why is the flag still?



The first observations of Mars as an object traveling in Earth's night sky was recorded by the ancient Egyptian astronomers, and by 1534 BCE the ancient astronomers were familiar with the retrograde movement of the planet. By the time of the Neo-Babylonian Empire, the Babylonian astronomers were making regular records of the positions of the planets, as well as systematic detections of their behavior. In the case of Mars, the ancient astronomers realized that it made 42 circuits of the zodiac every 79 years. These scientists of long ago even invented arithmetic methods so that they could make minor corrections pertaining to the predicted positions of the planets inhabiting our Solar System. The ancient astronomers referred to the planets as "wandering stars".



The astronomer Tycho Brahe, during the 17th century, measured the diurnal parallax of Mars that Johannes Kepler had used in order to make a preliminary calculation of the relative distance to the Red Planet. When the earliest telescopes to be used for astronomical purposes finally became available, the diurnal parallax of Mars was measured again in an attempt to determine the distance between our Sun and Earth. Giovanni Domenico Cassini was the first to make this measurement in 1692--but the early parallax measurements were hindered by the primitive quality of the instruments. The only occultation of Mars by the planet Venus was observed on October 13, 1590, by Michael Maestlin at Heidelberg. In 1610, Mars was viewed by the great astronomer Galileo Galilei, who was the first to make use of a primitive telescope for astronomical purposes. The Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens was the first to draw a map of Mars that showed terrain features.