NASA Emergency Response Teams kennedy kennedy space center page 5 NASA Teams Response Emergency

NASA Emergency Response Teams kennedy kennedy space center page 5 NASA Teams Response Emergency

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A little interesting about space life.

Some studies which have been performed in certain cities within the United States show that there is no correlation between the full moon phase and such things as a rise in suicides, crime rate, dog bites or births. And yet, other studies completed by such individuals as psychologists and other human behaviorists have shown that there is, in fact, a peak in certain kinds of behavior associated with a loss of contact with reality during full moons. These include murder, arson, dangerous driving and kleptomania, which is an irresistible impulse to steal due to an emotional rather than economical need.



and here is another

Europa, an icy little moon that circles the giant planet Jupiter, probably sustains a global ocean of liquid water beneath a tortured, shattered icy crust. For a long time, weird and jumbled regions of ice disruption, called "chaos terrains", were seen only on Europa, and their origins remained cloaked in mystery. But astronomers now think that the "chaos terrains" formed as the result of a subsurface liquid saltwater lake, equal to all of the Great Lakes on Earth combined. Hidden about 1.9 miles beneath Europa's cracked eggshell-like frozen crust, the ice-embedded lake may be one of the latest potentially habitable environments discovered so far in our Solar System.



and finally

In dramatic contrast, the inner region of our Solar System, where our Earth dwells--along with Mercury, Venus, and Mars--is relatively barren of moons. Mercury and Venus have no moons, and Mars is orbited by a small duo of deformed moons, Phobos and Deimos, that are probably asteroids that escaped from the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter billions of years ago--only to be captured by the Red Planet's powerful gravitational embrace. Our Earth is the only inner planet that possesses an impressively large, spherical Moon.

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When a moon is in an orbit around its parent-planet, all is well--just as long as the gravity that is holding the moon together in one piece exceeds the powerful, relentless pull of its planet. Alas, if a moon wanders too close, and the tidal forces of the parent-planet exceed the gravitational bind of the unlucky moon, the moon will fall apart. This is termed the Roche limit. Earth's relatively large Moon is a very fortunate natural satellite, and the limit here is a bit under 10,000 kilometers--while our Moon is a safe 385,000 kilometers away from our planet.



A moon is an enchanting thing! There are more than 100 lovely moons circling the eight major planets in our Solar System, alone--including our own beloved Moon--the brightest and largest gleaming object suspended in the brilliantly starry night sky above the Earth. But how did the moons of our Solar System come into being?



According to the new theory, moon-formation starts at the very edge of a planetary ring, where a fragile baby moon can begin to emerge without the danger of being ripped apart by the fierce gravity of its parent planet. These dancing little moonlets, formed from ring-material, then travel outward. As the ring-system continually produces moonlet after moonlet after moonlet, the small icy worlds coalesce to form increasingly larger moons. The larger moons, in turn, may also merge together, as they dance outward from their parent planet.