NASA Emergency Response Teams kennedy kennedy space center page 5 NASA Teams Response Emergency

NASA Emergency Response Teams kennedy kennedy space center page 5 NASA Teams Response Emergency

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A little interesting about space life.

No Satellite Pictures. Even with all of our telescopes on Earth and the incredibly powerful Hubble Telescope, none of them has ever taken any pictures with any of the landing sites of the Moon. This often misleads us to the thought: are they really out there?



and here is another

In order to spot such a remote exomoon, the authors of this new study, The Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler (HEK): III. The First Search for an Exomoon around a Habitable-Zone Planet, used a technique that models the dips and features of the parent star's light-curve (stellar brightness vs. time), which are caused by transits of the planet (and any accompanying moons) in front of the face of its star. This is a complicated and difficult endeavor because numerous and diverse models of planet-moon dynamics must be taken into consideration. Each one of these models possesses parameters that describe physical properties belonging to the planet or moon, as well as parameters describing the orbital system. The authors use what is termed Bayesian statistics to account for the fact that the true orbital model of this planetary system is still not known--and this enables them to calculate if a model with our without a moon fits the observed light-curve the best.



and finally

The bottom line is that the moon does impact fishing quite dramatically and knowing how is of great importance to any angler. The first thing that you need to know is that both the Full and New moon phases are when you want to be on the water fishing. The ways in which the moon impacts fishing are fascinating and worth learning for anyone who likes to spend their time on the water attempting to catch fish. It's no joke that the moon impacts fishing as much as the type of bait or lure you choose to use. Learn this simple information and you'll become a much more successful angler.

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Even though Theia came to a tragic end, it did not die in vain. This is because the ill-fated Theia made the emergence of life possible on Earth. Our lunar companion is responsible for creating a welcoming abode for living things on our planet, because it moderates Earth's wobble on its axis--thus creating a stable, life-friendly climate. Earth's Moon also is the source of ocean tides that form a rhythm that has guided human beings for thousands of years.



Discovering the water content of volcanic deposits on our Moon using orbital instruments presents quite a challenge. Planetary scientists use orbital spectrometers to measure the light that skips off of a planetary surface. By determining which electromagnetic wavelengths of light are reflected or absorbed by the surface, the scientists can then get an idea of which minerals and other compounds are present.



Such moon-forming mergers and collisions are not unheard of. For example, the leading theory explaining the formation of Earth's own large Moon, suggests that it was born about 4.5 billion years ago when a Mars-sized protoplanet, dubbed Theia by astronomers, collided with our planet. Just as our Moon is identical geologically to Earth's mantle, the six medium-sized icy sister moons of Saturn are all similar in composition to Titan's icy mantle, the researchers announced in October 2012.