NASA Emergency Response Teams space center emergency response team hones skills NASA Teams Response Emergency

NASA Emergency Response Teams space center emergency response team hones skills NASA Teams Response Emergency

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A little interesting about space life.

The temperatures around the equatorial and mid latitude surface at daytime and in the night are around 225oF and minus 298oF respectively. As the moon day is approximately 28 earth days, heating and cooling of the moon's surfaces affects the inside cave temperature significantly. The temperature difference in the opposite side of the moon makes the air in the cave move from one area to the other creating complex wind movements. When high speed wind flows across the vertical rock structures, it makes gurgling sounds in the caves, resulting in eerie or weird echo effects. The blowing wind helps to mitigate the high humidity conditions.



and here is another

Moons can be found in a rich assortment of various sizes, shapes, and types. Although they are generally solid little worlds, a few of them are known to sport atmospheres. Indeed, the atmosphere of the second largest moon in our Solar System, Titan of Saturn, is so dense that it hides Titan's strange hydrocarbon-slashed surface beneath a thick orange veil.



and finally

Triton is the largest of Neptune's 13 moons. It is an unusual world, twirling around its planet in the wrong direction. Many astronomers think that some time in the remote past, Triton was nudged out of its home in the Kuiper Belt, and during its wanderings in the darkness of interplanetary space, at last swept close enough to Neptune to feel the irresistible lure of that planet's gravity. As Neptune drew Triton into its gravitational embrace, that luckless wanderer from the Kuiper Belt underwent a sea-change from a comet-like denizen of our Solar System's outer limits, to a moon of one of the major planets. So, there Triton whirls around in its new home, circling its planet Neptune, but circling it backwards. And like all moons, it is now a dependent of its parent planet. As a matter of fact, the moon was given the name of Triton as an allusion to the demigod Triton's dependence on the sea-god Neptune in Greek mythology.

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Even though Theia came to a tragic end, it did not die in vain. This is because the ill-fated Theia made the emergence of life possible on Earth. Our lunar companion is responsible for creating a welcoming abode for living things on our planet, because it moderates Earth's wobble on its axis--thus creating a stable, life-friendly climate. Earth's Moon also is the source of ocean tides that form a rhythm that has guided human beings for thousands of years.



"Uranus and Neptune and--why not?--systems of satellites around exoplanets that we may identify in the future."



Research presented on October 19, 2012, at the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society's Division for Planetary Sciences held in Reno, Nevada, has suggested a causal relationship between the seven sister moons--Titan and the six mid-sized icy moons of Saturn. The researchers suggest that the seven moons have a violent origin, and came into being when a few considerably larger moons crashed into each other to give birth to the misty, moisty moon, Titan.