Nasa Empty Launch Pad nasa39s orion spacecraft passes its first test Pad Launch Nasa Empty

Nasa Empty Launch Pad nasa39s orion spacecraft passes its first test Pad Launch Nasa Empty

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A little interesting about space life.

Births and deaths are considered natural events in life and hence emotional situations at the levels experienced on the earth are unknown in the moon. Burial of bodies takes place a few hours after death. The persons, who happen to be the companions of the dead person at the time of death, get the assistance of others in the vicinity to wrap the dead body in fabric as in mummified bodies and prepare for its burial in an assigned area. There are no eulogies. The moon people believe that all persons are equal and hence have no notion of high or low status in this regard, other than for the special respect that they have for elders. No special burial ceremonies exist even for elders. It is the common belief that all dead persons go to heaven instantaneously after death. Because of this ages old belief, the people are generally happy for the dead ones rather than sad.



and here is another

Of course, in view of the recent findings, there are other reasons why Moon is so important for mankind. First of all, the findings from the Chandrayaan probe have shown unequivocally that water exists in the lunar poles. Hence, with the existence of water, colonizing the moon has not only become possible, it has become imperative. As you know, water contains both hydrogen as well as oxygen atoms. Hydrogen can be used as a propellant and as an energy source, while water can be used as an oxidizer as well as a major life support requirement. The oxygen is especially important, as it can be filtered to provide air and the water itself can be used from variety of ways from drinking to being used as a coolant in various subsystems. In addition, the proximity of the moon promises the transference of raw materials such as Helium 3 as well as iron that can be found beneath the lunar regolith. Hence, it is the time to go back to the Moon again for the sake of mankind.



and finally

The most detailed pictures of Europa show even more intriguing clues that there is slush lurking beneath its brightly shining icy surface. Slightly smaller than Earth's own beloved Moon, Europa's surface temperature could easily freeze an ocean solid over a span of only several million years. However, some astronomers think that warmth from a game of tidal tug-of-war between Europa and Jupiter, as well as other neighboring moons, could be keeping large regions of Europa's subsurface global ocean in a life-friendly liquid state. This process is termed tidal heating, and it refers to a mechanism whereby the gravitational tugs of a nearby object (or objects) flex and bend and contract and expand another object continually. This constant churning causes the victimized object, in this case Europa, to heat up and be considerably more balmy than its great distance from the Sun would otherwise allow it to be.

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Until 1610, when Galileo Galilei discovered the quartet of large Galilean moons orbiting Jupiter--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--Earth's Moon was the Moon, because it was the only moon known to exist. Now, we know differently. There are over 100 known moons in our Solar System alone, and probably many, many more, circling distant alien planets belonging to the families of stars beyond our Sun. Most of the moons in our own Solar System are relatively small, icy worldlets that contain only small amounts of rocky material. The faraway multitude of sparkling, frozen moons that inhabit our Sun's family are mostly found circling the quartet of outer gaseous giant planets--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In this dimly lit region, far from our Star's heat and light, these tiny icy moons perform a strange and lovely ballet around their large, gaseous host planets. The quartet of giant gaseous planets, that inhabit our Solar System's outer suburbs, are enshrouded by heavy atmospheres of gas, and they are accompanied in their travels around our Sun, by their own orbiting entourage of moons and moonlets.



Astronomers have for years contemplated two competing hypotheses explaining the origin of the Martian moons. The first proposes that Phobos and Deimos are, indeed, escapees from the Main Asteroid Belt. Alas, this viewpoint begs the question of why they should have been so cruelly captured by their adopted parent-planet in the first place. An alternative theory points to the possibility that the moons were born from the debris left by a violent collision between Mars and a primordial protoplanet--a baby planet still under construction. However, this theory also suffers from uncertainty because it does not explain precisely how this particular tragic mechanism gave rise to Phobos and Deimos.



According to the new theory, moon-formation starts at the very edge of a planetary ring, where a fragile baby moon can begin to emerge without the danger of being ripped apart by the fierce gravity of its parent planet. These dancing little moonlets, formed from ring-material, then travel outward. As the ring-system continually produces moonlet after moonlet after moonlet, the small icy worlds coalesce to form increasingly larger moons. The larger moons, in turn, may also merge together, as they dance outward from their parent planet.