Nasa Empty Launch Pad sts 125 external tank reentry observing campaign Pad Launch Nasa Empty

Nasa Empty Launch Pad sts 125 external tank reentry observing campaign Pad Launch Nasa Empty

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A little interesting about space life.

Moon jellies are the easiest jellyfish to keep alive in captivity. This is because of their diversity in nature. Moon jellies can be found in almost every ocean in the world. Their natural habitat stretches from the equator as far north as 70 latitude and as far south as 40 in every ocean that falls within those geographic parameters.



and here is another

Although Europa was visited by the two spacecraft Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 in the early 1970s, and the twin Voyagers in 1979, these early flybys only produced grainy, dim images. However, these early pictures revealed enough about the little moon to make it intriguing. Pale yellow icy plains were seen in the Voyager images. The plains also tantalizingly displayed red and brown mottled areas. Long cracks were observed, running for thousands of miles over the shattered eggshell-like crust. On Earth, similar cracks would suggest such features as high mountains and deep canyons. But nothing higher than a few kilometers was seen on the moon. In fact, Europa is one of the smoothest bodies in our Solar System.



and finally

"The good news is that our models show that observations of a wet Moon are not incompatible with a Giant Impact origin," Dr. Nakajima explained in the February 26 2018 Carnegie Institution Press Release.

More information:

JAXA has announced a space mission scheduled to begin in 2022, with an expected return to Earth in 2026. "Its objective is to carry out close-up remote sensing and in-situ observations of both Phobos and Deimos, and to bring back samples from Phobos," commented Dr. Ryuki Hyodo in the July 4, 2016 CNRS Press Release. Dr. Hyodo is a planetary scientist, originally from Kobe University in Japan, and he is also currently collaborating with the IPG. "High-resolution impact simulations are still needed to understand more about the disk structure," he continued to explain to the press.



He added that "In our model for the Saturn system, we propose that Titan grew in a couple of giant impacts, each one combining the masses of the colliding bodies, while shedding a small family of middle-sized moons."



Asphaug and co-author Dr. Andreas Reufer of the University of Bern in Switzerland, devised their new giant impact model using sophisticated computer simulations. They discovered that mergers between moons the size of Jupiter's Galilean satellites--which range in size from 1,940 miles wide (Europa) to 3, 271 miles across (Ganymede)--would tear icy stuff off the outer layers of the colliding moons. This icy material would then form spiral arms, which would ultimately merge together due to gravitational attraction to create Saturn's mid-sized icy moons.

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