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A little interesting about space life.

Titan possesses a smooth, young surface, scarred by comparatively few impact craters. The climate of this frigid moon--including its fierce winds and showers of hydrocarbon rain--carves out surface features that bear an eerie resemblance to those on Earth, such as lakes, sand dunes, rivers, seas, and deltas. Indeed, planetary scientists propose that Titan bears a haunting resemblance to Earth, and is believed to be similar to the way our planet was before life had a chance to evolve out of non-living substances (prebiotic).



and here is another

But ongoing studies about lunar chemistry are showing that it may be much wetter than planetary scientists initially hypothesized. In fact, these wetter conditions conflict with some aspects of the Giant Impact theory.



and finally

The inner Solar System is dramatically different from the distant realm of the giant planets. The inner region of our Solar System, where our Earth is situated, is almost entirely moon-less. Of the four relatively small, rocky worlds--Mercury, Venus, our Earth, and Mars--Mercury and Venus are barren of moons, and Mars is orbited by two fascinating, but very small, potato-shaped moons named Phobos and Deimos. The duo of Martian moons are often considered to be captured asteroids that long ago escaped from their birthplace in the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter. According to this scenario, Phobos and Deimos, during their dangerous journey from their original home, were snared by the gravity of their adopted Red Planet when our 4.56 billion-year-old Solar System was young. In the warm and well-lit inner Solar System, only Earth's large Moon is a significant moon-world in its own right.

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The lunar mantle reaches from the top of the partially molten layer to the bottom of the lunar crust. It is thought to be made up of minerals like pyroxine and olivine--both of which are composed of magnesium, iron, silicon and oxygen atoms.



Earth's Moon is a brilliant, beguiling, bewitching companion world. The largest and brightest object in our planet's night sky, it has for eons been the source of wild magical tales, myths, and poetry--as well as an ancient symbol for romantic love. Some traditional tales tell of a man's face etched on its bright surface, while still others whisper haunting childhood stories of a "Moon Rabbit". Lovely, ancient, and fantastic stories aside, Earth's Moon is a real object, a large rocky sphere that has been with our planet almost from the very beginning, when our Solar System was first forming over four billion years ago. But where did Earth's Moon come from? In April 2014, a team of planetary scientists announced that they had pinned down the birth date of the Moon to within 100 million years of the formation of our Solar System, and this new discovery indicates that Earth's Moon was most likely born about 4.47 billion years ago in a gigantic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth.



Such moon-forming mergers and collisions are not unheard of. For example, the leading theory explaining the formation of Earth's own large Moon, suggests that it was born about 4.5 billion years ago when a Mars-sized protoplanet, dubbed Theia by astronomers, collided with our planet. Just as our Moon is identical geologically to Earth's mantle, the six medium-sized icy sister moons of Saturn are all similar in composition to Titan's icy mantle, the researchers announced in October 2012.