NASA Lunar Tetrad blood moon footage first total lunar eclipse of 2014 Lunar Tetrad NASA

NASA Lunar Tetrad blood moon footage first total lunar eclipse of 2014 Lunar Tetrad NASA

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A little interesting about space life.

How did Triton acquire so many strange properties, and why is Neptune's system of satellites so different from those predicted for a gaseous giant planet? Two planetary scientists, Dr. Raluca Rufu (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Dr. Robin Canup (Southwest Research Institute, US) demonstrate how Triton wreaked catastrophic havoc on Neptune's first generation of very unfortunate moons.



and here is another

In a mysterious region beyond the orbit of the beautiful, banded, blue ice-giant planet Neptune--the most distant of the eight major planets from our Sun--there is a dark and frigid domain called the Kuiper Belt. Within this remote region, where our Sun shines with only a weak fire, and appears to be merely a particularly large star suspended in the black sky, a multitude of strange, icy worldlets tumble around our Star. Pluto, a large icy denizen inhabiting the Kuiper Belt, was originally classified as the ninth major planet from our Sun after its discovery in 1930. However, with the realization that this frozen "oddball" is really only one of several large, icy inhabitants of the Kuiper Belt, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) found it necessary to formally define "planet" in 2006--and poor Pluto was unceremoniously ousted from the pantheon of major planets. Pluto, now freshly reclassified as a dwarf planet, nonetheless remains a small world of great interest, debate, and affection. Scientists will soon learn much more about this beloved, distant, ice-ball so far away, when, after a treacherous nine-year journey of three million miles through interplanetary space, NASA's hearty New Horizons spacecraft arrives at Pluto on July 14, 2015.



and finally

The Kuiper Belt, sometimes called the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt, is a region located in our Solar System's outer limits beyond the realm of the eight major planets. It extends from the orbit of Neptune to approximately 50 AU. Neptune's average distance from our Sun is about 30.1 AU--its perihelion is 29.8 AU, while its aphelion is 30.4 AU.

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For most of the 20th century, astronomers thought that Pluto was a lonely little world, a solitary ball of ice circling our Sun, so very far from the comforting warmth and delightful light of our brilliant Star. However, in 1992, the discovery of the first KBO (other than Pluto), made astronomers come to the realization that Pluto is not far from the madding crowd of a vast population of other Kuiper Belt ice balls.



The February 2018 study, conducted by Carnegie and JPL astronomers, created detailed scenarios in order to determine whether existing theories about the catastrophic Giant Impact theory could explain a wet Moon that is still depleted in other volatile elements like sodium and potassium.



Earth's lunar companion is thought to have been born about 4.51 billion years ago, according to a recent study. This means that our Moon was born soon after Earth's formation in the primeval Solar System. The average distance of Earth's Moon from our planet is about 238,900 miles--or approximately 1.28 light-seconds--and it is in synchronous rotation with Earth, always showing the same face, with the near side famous for its beautiful bewitching dark volcanic maria (Latin for seas) that are situated between prominent impact craters and the bright, very ancient, crustal highlands. Our Moon's surface is actually quite dark, even though it appears in the sky at night to be very bright, with a reflectance only a bit higher than that of old asphalt. The prominent position of our Moon in our planet's night sky, as well as its regular cycle of phases, have made our nearest and dearest celestial companion a valuable cultural influence since ancient times in art, mythology, language, and on calendars.