NASA Mercury Rocket kennedy space center the mercury program Mercury NASA Rocket

NASA Mercury Rocket kennedy space center the mercury program Mercury NASA Rocket

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A little interesting about space life.

To make the flag stand still on the moon, the flag was actually made from plastic material, similar to the one that tents are usually made of. For practical reasons, the flag was originally folded to maximize space and stored in a thin tube. After Neil Armstrong planted it to the surface of the Moon, it briefly appeared to move as it was unfolding itself to its final shape.



and here is another

Earth's Moon is the fifth largest moon in our entire Solar System, as well as the only world beyond our planet that we have visited. Our lunar companion is the largest and brightest object in the sky at night, and many astronomers think that it was born when the tragedy that was the pulverized Theia blasted into ancient Earth billions of years ago. There are other theories, however, that seek to explain how our Moon came to be. Nevertheless, the Giant Impact theory stands its ground as the most credible explanation for lunar birth. When the doomed, destroyed Theia impacted Earth, it shot debris above our planet. This abundant debris eventually coalesced to form our Moon.



and finally

"The growing evidence for water inside the Moon suggest that water did somehow survive, or that it was brought in shortly after the impact by asteroids or comets before the Moon had completely solidified," explained Dr. Li in the July 24, 2017 Brown University Press Release. "The exact origin of water in the lunar interior is still a big question," he added.

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Most of Saturn's natural satellites are very small and icy dancing moonlets. However, the larger, icy midsized moons twirl around their enormous ringed planet in a lovely and mysterious dance. The largest of the icy moons is Rhea, Saturn's second-largest moon after the weird world that is Titan. Iapetus, the third largest of Saturn's moons, is two-faced, with one side composed of gleaming, very bright, highly reflective ice, and the other, dark and non-reflective, a blackened splotch staining the pristine white ice. Iapetus is larger than Mimas and Enceladus. There is an enormous impact crater on the moon Mimas, that stands out as a prominent feature on what is apparently a badly bombarded, heavily cratered world. The large impact crater Herschel on this 400-kilometer moon was excavated by a tumbling chunk of space-stuff made of rock, ice, or both, that came very close to powdering the entire little moon. Another icy moon, Enceladus, is a bewitching world, 500-kilometers in diameter, that is thought to harbor a global subsurface ocean beneath its frozen crust. Where there is liquid water there is always the possibility--though, by no means, the promise--of life. Enceladus also has the highest albedo of any other moon in our Solar System. This means that it has the most dazzlingly bright reflective surface. It also possesses a very active geology, rendering it almost free of craters because it is constantly being resurfaced by the emissions of gushing icy geysers that are responsible for fresh snow that keeps the surface of the little moon sparkling and smooth.



Such moon-forming mergers and collisions are not unheard of. For example, the leading theory explaining the formation of Earth's own large Moon, suggests that it was born about 4.5 billion years ago when a Mars-sized protoplanet, dubbed Theia by astronomers, collided with our planet. Just as our Moon is identical geologically to Earth's mantle, the six medium-sized icy sister moons of Saturn are all similar in composition to Titan's icy mantle, the researchers announced in October 2012.



The moon-mergers may have happened very long ago--or maybe quite recently. The mergers could have been tripped off by gravitational disruption caused by a migrating giant planet such as Uranus or Neptune, the researchers told the press in October 2012.