National Geographic Asteroid Belt facts about our neighbouring planets plus pluto and Belt Geographic Asteroid National

National Geographic Asteroid Belt facts about our neighbouring planets plus pluto and Belt Geographic Asteroid National

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A little interesting about space life.

Neptune is circled by only 14 moons, a considerably smaller number than Jupiter's 70. Also, most of Neptune's moons are extremely small. Triton, however, is an exception. In fact, Triton harbors 99.7% of the mass of Neptune's entire system of moons combined. The second-largest irregular moon in our Solar System, Phoebe of Saturn, sports only about 0.03% of Triton's mass. It is thought that Triton was snared by its adopted parent-planet some time after Neptune had already formed a system of moons. This means that the capture of the wandering Triton was likely a catastrophic event for Neptune's original moons, disrupting their orbits, and causing them to blast into each other--thus creating a rubble disc.



and here is another

They are prominent in the shallow coastal waters of estuaries and harbors which explains their abundance in what is still an infant branch within the larger saltwater aquarium trade industry. Because they are common in both temperate and tropical waters, they can tolerate temperature ranges anywhere between 42-88 F (6-31 C). Although they can survive in brackish water, a salinity level (specific gravity) of 1.023 will mimic their native marine environment.



and finally

"Prior to the Hubble observations, nobody appreciated the intricate dynamics of the Pluto system," Dr. Mark Showalter explained in a June 3, 2015 HST Press Release. Dr. Showalter is of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Institute in Mountain View, California. He is lead author of the Nature paper.

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Triton is the largest of Neptune's 13 moons. It is an unusual world, twirling around its planet in the wrong direction. Many astronomers think that some time in the remote past, Triton was nudged out of its home in the Kuiper Belt, and during its wanderings in the darkness of interplanetary space, at last swept close enough to Neptune to feel the irresistible lure of that planet's gravity. As Neptune drew Triton into its gravitational embrace, that luckless wanderer from the Kuiper Belt underwent a sea-change from a comet-like denizen of our Solar System's outer limits, to a moon of one of the major planets. So, there Triton whirls around in its new home, circling its planet Neptune, but circling it backwards. And like all moons, it is now a dependent of its parent planet. As a matter of fact, the moon was given the name of Triton as an allusion to the demigod Triton's dependence on the sea-god Neptune in Greek mythology.



A fourth, more recent model, is based on the existence of a synestia. A synestia is a doughnut-shaped cloud composed of vaporized molten rock. This recently discovered inhabitant of the Universe is believed to take shape when planet-sized bodies catastrophically blast into one another with both high energy and angular momentum. Soon after the discovery of these puffy celestial "doughnuts" in 2017, planetary scientists came to the realization that they may have a new way to explain Moon-birth. The ancient collisions, that create a synestia, are so violent that the objects that form from these cosmic crash-ups melt and partially vaporize. Ultimately, after having cooled off sufficiently to solidify, they create (almost) spherical planets, such as those inhabiting our own Solar System.



The astronomer Tycho Brahe, during the 17th century, measured the diurnal parallax of Mars that Johannes Kepler had used in order to make a preliminary calculation of the relative distance to the Red Planet. When the earliest telescopes to be used for astronomical purposes finally became available, the diurnal parallax of Mars was measured again in an attempt to determine the distance between our Sun and Earth. Giovanni Domenico Cassini was the first to make this measurement in 1692--but the early parallax measurements were hindered by the primitive quality of the instruments. The only occultation of Mars by the planet Venus was observed on October 13, 1590, by Michael Maestlin at Heidelberg. In 1610, Mars was viewed by the great astronomer Galileo Galilei, who was the first to make use of a primitive telescope for astronomical purposes. The Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens was the first to draw a map of Mars that showed terrain features.