National Geographic Asteroid Belt space rocks delivered one two punch to ancient earth Geographic Asteroid National Belt

National Geographic Asteroid Belt space rocks delivered one two punch to ancient earth Geographic Asteroid National Belt

We found 10++ Images in National Geographic Asteroid Belt:




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A little interesting about space life.

Triton also possesses a thin atmosphere composed mainly of nitrogen, and a smaller quantity of methane. This atmosphere probably is the result of Triton's cryovolcanism, which is enhanced by seasonal heating from the Sun. Although little is currently known of Pluto's atmosphere, it is thought to be primarily composed of nitrogen with some carbon monoxide and methane added to the mix--and it is extremely tenuous. Pluto's very thin atmosphere may exist as a gas only when Pluto is nearest to the Sun (perihelion). For most of Pluto's very long year, the atmospheric gases are frozen in the form of ice on its extremely frigid surface. One year on Triton is almost 248 Earth-years long--or 90,471 Earth-days!



and here is another

Earth's Moon is our planet's closest neighbor in space, but it is remarkable how even neighbors can keep secrets from each other. For years, astronomers thought that Earth's Moon was barren of water and other volatile compounds, but this notion began to change in 2008, when a team of planetary scientists announced that they had discovered small quantities of water imprisoned within volcanic glass beads, that astronauts had carried back to Earth from the Apollo 13 and 17 missions to our Moon. In 2011, additional research revealed extremely tiny crystalline formations within those beads--indicating that they contained quantities of water similar to some basalts on Earth.



and finally

Until 1610, when Galileo Galilei discovered the quartet of large Galilean moons orbiting Jupiter--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--Earth's Moon was the Moon, because it was the only moon known to exist. Now, we know differently. There are over 100 known moons in our Solar System alone, and probably many, many more, circling distant alien planets belonging to the families of stars beyond our Sun. Most of the moons in our own Solar System are relatively small, icy worldlets that contain only small amounts of rocky material. The faraway multitude of sparkling, frozen moons that inhabit our Sun's family are mostly found circling the quartet of outer gaseous giant planets--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In this dimly lit region, far from our Star's heat and light, these tiny icy moons perform a strange and lovely ballet around their large, gaseous host planets. The quartet of giant gaseous planets, that inhabit our Solar System's outer suburbs, are enshrouded by heavy atmospheres of gas, and they are accompanied in their travels around our Sun, by their own orbiting entourage of moons and moonlets.

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In addition to the Giant Impact theory, there are several other models that have been proposed to explain how our Moon was born. One alternative model to the Giant Impact scenario suggests that Earth's Moon was once a part of our planet that simply budded off when our Solar System was in its infancy--approximately 4.5 billion years ago. According to this model, the Pacific Ocean basin would be the most likely cradle for lunar birth. A second model proposes that our Moon was really born elsewhere in our Solar System and, like the duo of tiny potato-shaped Martian moons, was eventually snared by the gravitational tug of a major planet. A third theory postulates that both Earth and Moon were born at about the same time from the same protoplanetary accretion disk, composed of gas and dust, from which our Sun's family of planets, moons, and smaller objects ultimately emerged.



Although Theia made the ultimate sacrifice, it did not die in vain because this unfortunate world's demise made life possible on Earth. Earth's Moon makes our planet livable; it moderates Earth's wobble on its axis, resulting in a relatively stable, life-sustaining climate, and it also causes ocean tides that create a rhythm that has guided humanity for thousands of years.



However, the theory that has long been held to be the most likely explanation is the giant impact theory, suggesting that the Mars-sized body named Theia smashed into the ancient Earth billions of years ago. The monumental blast resulted in a portion of the primordial Earth's crust to be hurled off screaming into Space. This ancient catastrophe tossed a multitude of somersaulting moonlets into the sky, and some of this material was ultimately captured into orbit around the ancient Earth about 4.5 billion years ago, where it finally was pulled together by the force of gravity to become the Moon.