Neil Armstrong Crater apollo 11 little west crater panorama the planetary society Neil Armstrong Crater

Neil Armstrong Crater apollo 11 little west crater panorama the planetary society Neil Armstrong Crater

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A little interesting about space life.

The people of the Moon are well aware of the barren, austere conditions and the life threatening dangers on the moon's surface. As very orderly and self-disciplined citizens or as their brains have been programmed to do so, the people of the moon always keep away from those egresses and never attempt to go out to explore the outer surface.



and here is another

Moons are enchanting, mesmerizing objects dwelling in their orbits around planets both within and beyond our Solar System. Earth's own large Moon, a silver-golden world that shines in our starlit night sky with the reflected fires of our Star, the Sun, has long been the inspiration of haunting poems and tales of love, as well as myths of magic and madness. Most of the moons of our Sun's own bewitching family are glistening little icy worlds in orbit around the giant planets of the outer Solar System. In June 2013, astronomers announced their dedicated hunt for a habitable moon-world beyond our Sun's family, circling around the planet Kepler-22b, that dwells in the faraway family of a different star.



and finally

The inner Solar System is dramatically different from the distant realm of the giant planets. The inner region of our Solar System, where our Earth is situated, is almost entirely moon-less. Of the four relatively small, rocky worlds--Mercury, Venus, our Earth, and Mars--Mercury and Venus are barren of moons, and Mars is orbited by two fascinating, but very small, potato-shaped moons named Phobos and Deimos. The duo of Martian moons are often considered to be captured asteroids that long ago escaped from their birthplace in the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter. According to this scenario, Phobos and Deimos, during their dangerous journey from their original home, were snared by the gravity of their adopted Red Planet when our 4.56 billion-year-old Solar System was young. In the warm and well-lit inner Solar System, only Earth's large Moon is a significant moon-world in its own right.

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Earth's Moon is a brilliant, beguiling, bewitching companion world. The largest and brightest object in our planet's night sky, it has for eons been the source of wild magical tales, myths, and poetry--as well as an ancient symbol for romantic love. Some traditional tales tell of a man's face etched on its bright surface, while still others whisper haunting childhood stories of a "Moon Rabbit". Lovely, ancient, and fantastic stories aside, Earth's Moon is a real object, a large rocky sphere that has been with our planet almost from the very beginning, when our Solar System was first forming over four billion years ago. But where did Earth's Moon come from? In April 2014, a team of planetary scientists announced that they had pinned down the birth date of the Moon to within 100 million years of the formation of our Solar System, and this new discovery indicates that Earth's Moon was most likely born about 4.47 billion years ago in a gigantic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth.



"How can this be? Is it just a matter of size? Location? What about Mercury and Venus? Did they grow on similar timescales to the Earth or on timescales more similar to Mars? I think these are some of the really important questions that we, as a community of planetary scientists, will be addressing in the future," Dr. Jacobson told the press in April 2014.



Therefore, the planetary ring-spreading model can explain how the majority of regular moons were born in our Solar System.