Neil Armstrong Recording 8 primary teaching resources for the 50th anniversary of Recording Armstrong Neil

Neil Armstrong Recording 8 primary teaching resources for the 50th anniversary of Recording Armstrong Neil

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A little interesting about space life.

The lakes are the main supporting source sustaining life in the moon. The lakes support an array of living organisms including fish of various varieties and some small sized aquatic mammals also, like on the earth. Only a limited range of water plants grow in the lakes and these are all found in all the lakes in the moon. The most abundant water plant variety resembles seaweeds, but is very much thicker and stronger than the earth's variety. These water plants which grow very rapidly and proliferate in vast quantities are the primary source of food and nutrient for the moon people.



and here is another

Moons can be found in a rich assortment of various sizes, shapes, and types. Although they are generally solid little worlds, a few of them are known to sport atmospheres. Indeed, the atmosphere of the second largest moon in our Solar System, Titan of Saturn, is so dense that it hides Titan's strange hydrocarbon-slashed surface beneath a thick orange veil.



and finally

The new study is based on data gathered by Cassini's radar instrument during flybys of Titan between 2007 and 2015.

More information:

Earth's Moon completes one orbit around our planet every 27 days, and it rotates (spins) at the same rate. Because Earth is also moving--rotating on its axis as it circles our Star--from our perspective our lunar companion appears to orbit us every 29 days.



The Giant-Impact Theory, alternatively termed the Theia Impact, or Big Splash Theory, proposes that Earth's Moon was born from the debris remaining from a catastrophic collision, that occurred about 4.3 billion years ago, between the primordial Earth and an unfortunate protoplanet, that was about the size of Mars. The Earth's Moon-forming collision would have occurred when our Solar System was still forming during the Hadean eon. The Hadean eon occurred about 20 to 100 million years after our Solar System emerged from its frigid, dark natal cloud of gas and dust. The doomed impacting protoplanet, often called Theia, received its name in honor of a Titan in Greek mythology who was the mother of Selene, the Moon goddess. An analysis of lunar rocks, published in 2016, indicates that this catastrophic crash was a direct hit--causing a thorough mixing of both Earth-stuff and Theia-stuff. The Giant-Impact Theory is the favored scientific explanation for the birth of Earth's Moon.



"I think the best thing about this work is that they explain this link between the mass of the moon and the orbital distance, which was known before but not understood," said planetary scientist, Dr. David Nesvorny, in the November 29, 2012 Scientific American. Dr. Nesvorny, of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, who did not contribute to the new research, added that "If you had asked me a few years ago, I would think of our Moon's formation and the formation of the satellites of the outer planets differently. This puts things on common ground."