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Neil Armstrong Recording tv review neil armstrong first man on the moon Armstrong Neil Recording

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A little interesting about space life.

However, according to many conspiracy theorists, all the U.S. landings on the moon were faked, and all the photos and videos were made only on the film stage.



and here is another

Neptune, the eighth major planet from the Sun, and its neighboring sister-planet, Uranus--the seventh planet from the Sun--are both classified as ice-giants because their large cores are icy, and they never managed to acquire the immense gaseous envelopes of the two true gas-giants, Jupiter and Saturn. The gas giants are possibly composed entirely of gas and liquid, although they may have small solid cores. In contrast, the ice-giants have large solid cores and thinner atmospheres. The two gas-giants, being mostly atmosphere, are very lightweight for their size. Saturn is the lightest planet in our Solar System, despite its immense diameter. In fact, Saturn is light enough to float like a huge raft in water, provided there was an ocean big enough for it to bob around in.



and finally

The Burmese month of Kason (April/May), the second month of the Burmese year, has arrived and 'Kason la pyei', the Full-moon of Kason marks an important date for Burmese people, in general, and Burmese Buddhists, in particular. It is a month of commemoration and anticipation. Why this is so you will learn while reading this article.

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Now we know that there are over 100 moons circling the eight major planets of our Sun's family. The majority of our Solar System's moons are icy, small, and frozen worlds that contain only small quantities of rocky material. The distant multitude of sparkling, icy moons in our Solar System are primarily in orbit around the four giant gaseous planets, Here, in this strange, frigid and dimly-lit realm, far from our Star's melting fires and brilliant light, these tiny frozen moons do their fabulous, lovely dance around their quartet of parent-planets. The giant, gaseous worlds that inhabit our Solar System's outer suburbs--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune--are blanketed by heavy atmospheres of gas, and are accompanied, in their travels around our Star, by their orbiting retinue of many moons and sparkling, icy moonlets.



Several theories have been around for a long time that have attempted to explain how Earth's Moon was born. The first theory suggests that the Moon was once part of Earth, and that it somehow budded off about 4.5 billion years ago. According to this theory, the Pacific Ocean basin is the most likely site for where this occurred. A second theory postulates that the interaction of Sun-orbiting and Earth-orbiting planetesimals (the ancient building-blocks of planets), in the early years of our Solar System, caused them to disintegrate. Earth's Moon then coalesced out of the shattered debris of the pulverized planetesimals. A third theory proposes that the Earth and Moon were born together out of the original nebula that gave rise to our Solar System, and a fourth theory suggests that the Moon was really born somewhere else in our Solar System, and was ultimately captured by Earth's gravity when it traveled too close.



A moon is a natural body that orbits a planet, and is held in its orbit by the force of both the host planet's gravity and the gravity of the moon itself. Some planets sport moons; some do not. Most of the moons dwelling in our Solar System are frigid (and sometimes weird) little worlds, made up of ice and rock, that swarm around the outer giant, gaseous planets of our Sun's bewitching family--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. One example of such bewitching weirdness is the frozen, little icy moon Hyperion, of the ringed-planet Saturn, that looks like an icy natural sponge.