Neil Armstrong Recording tv review neil armstrong first man on the moon Armstrong Neil Recording

Neil Armstrong Recording tv review neil armstrong first man on the moon Armstrong Neil Recording

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A little interesting about space life.

Jupiter, the largest planet in our Solar System, also has the largest moon--Ganymede. A large number of Jovian moons sport highly elliptical orbits and also circle backwards--that is, opposite to the spin of their planet. Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune also sport such so-called irregular moons, that orbit far from their respective parent planets.



and here is another

You see, when the moon looks a certain way, that's called a phase, and certain phases of the moon mean that fish are more active. That means if you spend time on the water fishing, you'll be more successful simply due to the fact that the moon is in a certain phase. I realize how strange this may sound to some of you, but it's nonetheless true. Simply spending your fishing time fishing when the moon is Full or New will have a dramatic result on your catch rates.



and finally

Until 1610, when Galileo Galilei discovered the quartet of large Galilean moons orbiting Jupiter--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--Earth's Moon was the Moon, because it was the only moon known to exist. Now, we know differently. There are over 100 known moons in our Solar System alone, and probably many, many more, circling distant alien planets belonging to the families of stars beyond our Sun. Most of the moons in our own Solar System are relatively small, icy worldlets that contain only small amounts of rocky material. The faraway multitude of sparkling, frozen moons that inhabit our Sun's family are mostly found circling the quartet of outer gaseous giant planets--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In this dimly lit region, far from our Star's heat and light, these tiny icy moons perform a strange and lovely ballet around their large, gaseous host planets. The quartet of giant gaseous planets, that inhabit our Solar System's outer suburbs, are enshrouded by heavy atmospheres of gas, and they are accompanied in their travels around our Sun, by their own orbiting entourage of moons and moonlets.

More information:

"The growing evidence for water inside the Moon suggest that water did somehow survive, or that it was brought in shortly after the impact by asteroids or comets before the Moon had completely solidified," explained Dr. Li in the July 24, 2017 Brown University Press Release. "The exact origin of water in the lunar interior is still a big question," he added.



Several theories have been around for a long time that have attempted to explain how Earth's Moon was born. The first theory suggests that the Moon was once part of Earth, and that it somehow budded off about 4.5 billion years ago. According to this theory, the Pacific Ocean basin is the most likely site for where this occurred. A second theory postulates that the interaction of Sun-orbiting and Earth-orbiting planetesimals (the ancient building-blocks of planets), in the early years of our Solar System, caused them to disintegrate. Earth's Moon then coalesced out of the shattered debris of the pulverized planetesimals. A third theory proposes that the Earth and Moon were born together out of the original nebula that gave rise to our Solar System, and a fourth theory suggests that the Moon was really born somewhere else in our Solar System, and was ultimately captured by Earth's gravity when it traveled too close.



Research presented on October 19, 2012, at the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society's Division for Planetary Sciences held in Reno, Nevada, has suggested a causal relationship between the seven sister moons--Titan and the six mid-sized icy moons of Saturn. The researchers suggest that the seven moons have a violent origin, and came into being when a few considerably larger moons crashed into each other to give birth to the misty, moisty moon, Titan.