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A little interesting about space life.

During the 2013 experiment, the radar instrument spotted echoes emanating from the seafloor and determined the depth of Ligeia Mare along Cassini's track over that strange methane sea. This represented the first-ever detection of the bottom of an extraterrestrial sea. The astronomers were amazed to find that depths in this distant, alien sea were as great as 525 feet at the deepest point along the track the radar pointed.



and here is another

In addition to the Giant Impact theory, there are several other models that have been proposed to explain how our Moon was born. One alternative model to the Giant Impact scenario suggests that Earth's Moon was once a part of our planet that simply budded off when our Solar System was in its infancy--approximately 4.5 billion years ago. According to this model, the Pacific Ocean basin would be the most likely cradle for lunar birth. A second model proposes that our Moon was really born elsewhere in our Solar System and, like the duo of tiny potato-shaped Martian moons, was eventually snared by the gravitational tug of a major planet. A third theory postulates that both Earth and Moon were born at about the same time from the same protoplanetary accretion disk, composed of gas and dust, from which our Sun's family of planets, moons, and smaller objects ultimately emerged.



and finally

The inner Solar System is dramatically different from the distant realm of the giant planets. The inner region of our Solar System, where our Earth is situated, is almost entirely moon-less. Of the four relatively small, rocky worlds--Mercury, Venus, our Earth, and Mars--Mercury and Venus are barren of moons, and Mars is orbited by two fascinating, but very small, potato-shaped moons named Phobos and Deimos. The duo of Martian moons are often considered to be captured asteroids that long ago escaped from their birthplace in the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter. According to this scenario, Phobos and Deimos, during their dangerous journey from their original home, were snared by the gravity of their adopted Red Planet when our 4.56 billion-year-old Solar System was young. In the warm and well-lit inner Solar System, only Earth's large Moon is a significant moon-world in its own right.

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In order to do precisely that, Dr. Li and Dr. Milliken used laboratory-based measurements of samples returned from the Apollo missions, combined with a detailed temperature profile of the areas of interest on the lunar surface. Using the new thermal correction, the two astronomers studied the data derived from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper, which is an imaging spectrometer that was carried aboard India's Chandrayaan-1 lunar orbiter.



"Uranus and Neptune and--why not?--systems of satellites around exoplanets that we may identify in the future."



"This means that at the atomic level, the Earth and the Moon are identical. This new information challenged the giant impact theory for lunar formation," study lead author Dr. Seth Jacobson told Space.com on April 2, 2014. Dr. Jacobson is a planetary scientist at the Cote d'Azur Observatory in Nice, France.