Planet.com Saturn natural science the planets in the solar system Saturn Planet.com

Planet.com Saturn natural science the planets in the solar system Saturn Planet.com

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A little interesting about space life.

When moon people moved from one city to another, the moving group always mixed with others who had arrived there from the other six directions. At every new occasion, they always merged into new groups without seeking to stay with their original group. The mixing up of groups was a continuous process that took place at every city center. As a result of mixing into groups and splitting their journeys into seven directions at each city center, after a few years, it was always difficult to find another person from one's original group. This was not applicable at the individual level to a couple of a male and female as such couples always stayed together. By constantly moving from one area to another, the people were exposed to almost the entire vast area of their habitat during their life time and also made them have the opportunity to intermingle with the entire noon population of around 2 million persons. The average life span of moon people is over 100 earth years and this might be due to the type of food they ate, the ritualistic walking habit they perform for more than half their life time and perhaps the greatest influence might be the lives free from conflict and stress that they lead.



and here is another

The team also considered whether it would be possible to determine, with an adequate degree of certainty, if a detected moon could bear life-loving liquid water. In their analysis, the "input" climate for the moon is habitable, which is identified with high probability. However, there still remains approximately a one in six failure rate.



and finally

Saturn, along with its frozen retinue of icy rings, dazzling moons, and sparkling moonlets, orbits our Sun about ten times farther out than the Earth. Astronomers received their first collection of detailed data about Titan when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander arrived there in 2004. The Huygens lander successfully obtained revealing images when it drifted down to Titan's tormented, hydrocarbon-slashed surface, as well as when it was still floating slowly and softly down through the moon's thick, foggy, orange atmosphere--which has 1.4 times greater pressure than that of our own planet. These pictures, when combined with other studies using instruments aboard the Cassini orbiter, reveal to curious planetary scientists that Titan's geological features include lakes and river channels filled with methane, ethane, and propane. Titan's strange surface also shows mountains and sand dunes--and it is pockmarked by craters. The rippling dunes form when fierce winds sweep up loose particles from the surface and then tosses them downwind. However, the sands of Titan are not like the sands on our Earth. Titan's "sand" is both bizarre and alien, probably composed of very small particles of solid hydrocarbons--or, possibly, ice imprisoned within hydrocarbons--with a density of about one-third that of the sand on our own planet. Furthermore, Titan's gravity is low. In fact, it is only approximately one-seventh that of Earth. This means that, working in combination with the low density of Titan's sand particles, they carry only the small weight of a mere four percent that of terrestrial sand. Titan's "sand" is about the same light-weight as freeze-dried grains of coffee!

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Images of Europa taken by Galileo in 1997 provide some important evidence suggesting that Europa may be slushy just beneath its glistening cracked icy crust--and possibly even warmer at greater depths. This evidence includes an oddly shallow impact crater, chunky-looking textured blocks of surface material that tantalizingly resemble icebergs on Earth, and openings in the surface where new icy crust appears to have formed between continent-sized plates of ice.



"For decades scientists have thought Jupiter's moon Europa was a likely place for life, but now we have specific, exciting regions on the icy moon to focus our future studies, " Dr. Don Blankenship, senior research scientist at the University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics, commented in the November 16, 2011 National Geographic News.



Asphaug and co-author Dr. Andreas Reufer of the University of Bern in Switzerland, devised their new giant impact model using sophisticated computer simulations. They discovered that mergers between moons the size of Jupiter's Galilean satellites--which range in size from 1,940 miles wide (Europa) to 3, 271 miles across (Ganymede)--would tear icy stuff off the outer layers of the colliding moons. This icy material would then form spiral arms, which would ultimately merge together due to gravitational attraction to create Saturn's mid-sized icy moons.