Planet.com Saturn nssdca photo gallery saturn Saturn Planet.com

Planet.com Saturn nssdca photo gallery saturn Saturn Planet.com

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A little interesting about space life.

Legend has it that A) the day he was born as Prince Siddhartha Gautama in ca. 563 B.C., B) the day of his 'Great Enlightenment' under the Bodhi tree (Tree of Enlightenment) in ca. 533 B.C. and C) the day of his death, i.e. his passing on to 'Nibbana' or 'Parinibanna' (a state of neither being existent nor non-existent that to reach is Buddhism's ultimate goal) as 'Buddha', meaning the 'Enlightened One' in ca. 483 B.C. fell all on a full-moon day, the day celebrated by the Burmese Buddhists as full-moon day of Kason. For this reason this day is also called 'Thrice Blessed Day' or 'Three-fold Anniversary'. Subsequently the 'Full-moon Day of Kason' marks the three main events of Siddhartha Gautama Buddha's life and as such it is celebrated in a fitting manner by Burmese Buddhists all over the country.



and here is another

Earth's Moon is our planet's closest neighbor in space, but it is remarkable how even neighbors can keep secrets from each other. For years, astronomers thought that Earth's Moon was barren of water and other volatile compounds, but this notion began to change in 2008, when a team of planetary scientists announced that they had discovered small quantities of water imprisoned within volcanic glass beads, that astronauts had carried back to Earth from the Apollo 13 and 17 missions to our Moon. In 2011, additional research revealed extremely tiny crystalline formations within those beads--indicating that they contained quantities of water similar to some basalts on Earth.



and finally

Because the lunar atmosphere is very thin, it is far too sparse to prevent a steady shower of impacts from tumbling asteroids, comets, and meteoroids. These objects strike the lunar surface, leaving behind numerous crater scars. For example, Tycho Crater is over 52 miles wide.

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The new study was published in the April 3, 2014 issue of the journal Nature, and it may provide a solution to a long-standing mystery of lunar origins pertaining to why Earth and its lovely companion appear to sport virtually identical compositions.



Crida and Charnoz tested their new model to find out whether it could be applied to other planets in addition to Saturn. Their investigation has brought to light several valuable facts. This scenario for moon-birth from planet-rings succeeds in offering an explanation as to why the largest moons dwell farther away from their parent planet than the smaller moons. It further explains the gathering of moons close to the Roche limit--their birthplace--on the outermost fringes of the rings. This distribution is in agreement with what is seen in the Saturn-system. The same scenario can also apply to the moons of other giant planets, such as the ice-giants Uranus and Neptune. The Uranus-system and the Neptune-system are also organized in a similar way. This discovery suggests that long ago, when these planets were young, they also sported impressive rings like those of Saturn--which ultimately vanished when their moons were born. Finally, this scenario can also explain the formation of Earth's Moon, and the moons of the dwarf planet Pluto. According to Crida and Charnoz's calculations, under special circumstances a single moon--like Earth's own--can be born from a primordial ring around its planet. This may well have occurred in both the case of Earth's single large Moon, and for Pluto's largest moon, Charon.



According to this theory, the Saturn system began with a family of several relatively large moons, analogous to the four large Galilean moons of Jupiter--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. However, strange and violent things happened in the Saturn system that drove its large moons onto a collision course with destiny. According to the theory, there were a few dramatic moon mergers, forming the Titan that we now know--but there was also a sufficiently large quantity of moon-stuff left over from the collisions to create the icy mid-sized satellites--Mimas, Iapetus, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea!