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A little interesting about space life.

Looking inward from Triton, there are seven regular moons, all of which display prograde orbits in planes that are situated close to Neptune's equitorial plane, and some of these small moons orbit within Neptune's rings. It is thought that these seven small moons were re-accreted from the rubble ring that formed after Neptune snared Triton. This would have occurred some time after Triton's orbit had become circular. In addition, Neptune is circled by six more outer irregular moons other than Triton, including Nereid, whose orbits are considerably farther from Neptune and at high inclination: A trio of these moons sport prograde orbits, while the remainder have retrograde orbits. Indeed, Nereid has an unusually close and eccentric orbit for an irregular moon. This suggests that Nereid may have once been a regular moon that was badly disturbed and nudged into its current position when Triton was snared by Neptune's gravity. The duo of outermost Neptunian irregular moons, Psamathe and Neso, have the largest orbits of any natural satellites known in our Solar System to date.



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The Cassini-Huygens mission is a collaborative NASA/European Space Agency/Italian Space Agency robotic spacecraft that is observing the Saturn system. The spacecraft was initially constructed to sport two components: One is the European Space Agency-designed Huygens Probe named in honor of the Dutch mathematician and astronomer Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695), who discovered Titan. Huygens also studied the rings of Saturn. The second component, the NASA-designed Cassini Orbiter, was named for the Italian-French astronomer Giovanni Dominico Cassini (1625-1712) who discovered four of Saturn's other moons. After a long, difficult journey through interplanetary space, that took it from Earth to Saturn, Cassini-Huygens finally reached the realm of the ringed planet on July 1, 2004. On December 25, 2004, the Huygens Probe was deliberately severed from the Cassini Orbiter, and began its descent down to the long-veiled and hidden surface of Titan--sending back, to waiting astronomers on Earth, an abundance of valuable information about the mysterious moon-world. Titan, at last, had its hidden face unveiled--revealing its well-kept secrets. The mission will continue until 2017.



and finally

Dr. Le Gall and her team used the newly acquired depth-sounding information in order to separate the contributions made to the sea's detected temperature by the liquid sea and the seabed, which provided new insights into their compositions.

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Well, if you remember correctly I have mentioned that in Kason water is in more than one way important to the Burmese. And water is the subject of anticipation. Burmese farmers put it into the following words: "Water in the ponds recedes in Tagu and the whole land is parched in Kason."



"What people frequently forget in this field is that you never have just one big impact. We have to worry about how big the next biggest impact was," and whether that impact blurred the effects of the previous giant impact, he continued to explain.



"What makes the Saturn system so beautiful and unique could be its youth. While we don't have a preferred time frame for this origin scenario to play out, it could have happened recently if something came along to destabilize the Saturn system, triggering the collisional mergers that formed Titan," Asphaug added.