Planet.com Saturn science based if we push super saturn to the distance of Planet.com Saturn

Planet.com Saturn science based if we push super saturn to the distance of Planet.com Saturn

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A little interesting about space life.

When Apollo 11 landed on the Moon in 1969, we were presented with our first human contact with the moon. The mission was able to accomplish the task of not only landing on the Moon, but also to return to the Earth with samples from the Moon. These samples along with subsequent presented us with answers regarding the composition of the Moon, which also gave us some basic facts that any theory about how the moon was created must answer/address. We learned:The Moon does not contain an iron core like our Earth does, due to the fact that the Moon's density is only 3.34 grams per cubic centimeter (compared to the Earth's which is 5.52 grams per cubic centimeter).Samples collected from the surface of the Moon reveal that it underwent extreme heat and baking, much more than what the Earth experienced.



and here is another

They believed that heaven was a community based place without a leader, or elders, and that it had a social structure identical to the one they enjoyed in the moon. They did not have a concept of "Hell" and probably did not have a word meaning "sin" or any word with a meaning even slightly resembling it. Words such as sin, cruelty, evil, jealousy, anger, crime, fight, aggression, war, etc., were totally unknown to the moon people.



and finally

Dr. Lieber and his colleagues did a study to test the theory of full-moon "lunacy". They studied data on murders in Dade County of Florida which covered 15 years and a total of 1,887 deaths by homicide. When they compared the deaths with the phases of the moon, they found that the two rose and fell together for the entire 15 years! With the approach of a full or new moon, there was a sharp spike in the murder rate, and then a decline during the first and last quarters of the moon.

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There is also a famous farmer's manual called the Maine Farmers Almanac, which was used to record the weather and moon phases. The first full moon of the month was recorded in red on the due date and the second full moon of the month, recorded in blue. This could be the first modern day origin of the term. When there are two full moons within a calendar month, in modern times the second full moon of the month is referred to by meteorologists and astronomers as a blue moon. This only occurs once every 33 months. Not that rare really. The last one was in July 2004 and the next after today's will not grace us with its presence until December 2009. Hence the term, "Once In a Blue Moon".



"The key question is whether those Apollo samples represent the bulk conditions of the lunar interior or instead represent unusual or perhaps anomalous water-rich regions within an otherwise 'dry' mantle. By looking at the orbital data, we can examine the large pyroclastic deposits on the Moon that were never sampled by the Apollo or Luna missions. The fact that nearly all of them exhibit signatures of water suggests that the Apollo samples are not anomalous, so it may be that the bulk interior of the Moon is wet," explained Dr. Ralph Milliken in a July 24, 2017 Brown University Press Release. Dr. Milliken is the lead author of the new research and an associate professor in Brown University's Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences. Brown University is in Providence, Rhode Island.



"What people frequently forget in this field is that you never have just one big impact. We have to worry about how big the next biggest impact was," and whether that impact blurred the effects of the previous giant impact, he continued to explain.