Planet.com Saturn sciencecasts saturn close up youtube Saturn Planet.com

Planet.com Saturn sciencecasts saturn close up youtube Saturn Planet.com

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A little interesting about space life.

Astronomers' current understanding of giant-planet birth predicts an episode of gas accretion that ultimately builds up the enormous size of these gaseous behemoths. According to theory, circumplanetary gas disks, that surround the forming planets during this early period, eventually become the strange nurseries that produce a giant planet's system of moons, thus creating systems of co-planar and prograde (orbiting in the same direction as the planet) natural satellites in a way similar to the many moons of Jupiter and Saturn.



and here is another

o understand the lunar phases you should first observe the changes of the shapes of the moon and when it appears so. The moon's figure is formed through reflection of sunlight from the Sun then shining onto the Earth's surface. The moon phases are a great portion of the study considering the series of movement is what makes the moon a unique object in the universe. In fact during the ancient days, it was the moon that plays the role as a time reference and prediction for best fishing times. Due to the moon and its benefits, people noticed the changes of the moon's figure, conducted researches and concluded many things.



and finally

Saturn, along with its frozen retinue of icy rings, dazzling moons, and sparkling moonlets, orbits our Sun about ten times farther out than the Earth. Astronomers received their first collection of detailed data about Titan when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander arrived there in 2004. The Huygens lander successfully obtained revealing images when it drifted down to Titan's tormented, hydrocarbon-slashed surface, as well as when it was still floating slowly and softly down through the moon's thick, foggy, orange atmosphere--which has 1.4 times greater pressure than that of our own planet. These pictures, when combined with other studies using instruments aboard the Cassini orbiter, reveal to curious planetary scientists that Titan's geological features include lakes and river channels filled with methane, ethane, and propane. Titan's strange surface also shows mountains and sand dunes--and it is pockmarked by craters. The rippling dunes form when fierce winds sweep up loose particles from the surface and then tosses them downwind. However, the sands of Titan are not like the sands on our Earth. Titan's "sand" is both bizarre and alien, probably composed of very small particles of solid hydrocarbons--or, possibly, ice imprisoned within hydrocarbons--with a density of about one-third that of the sand on our own planet. Furthermore, Titan's gravity is low. In fact, it is only approximately one-seventh that of Earth. This means that, working in combination with the low density of Titan's sand particles, they carry only the small weight of a mere four percent that of terrestrial sand. Titan's "sand" is about the same light-weight as freeze-dried grains of coffee!

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The most detailed pictures of Europa show even more intriguing clues that there is slush lurking beneath its brightly shining icy surface. Slightly smaller than Earth's own beloved Moon, Europa's surface temperature could easily freeze an ocean solid over a span of only several million years. However, some astronomers think that warmth from a game of tidal tug-of-war between Europa and Jupiter, as well as other neighboring moons, could be keeping large regions of Europa's subsurface global ocean in a life-friendly liquid state. This process is termed tidal heating, and it refers to a mechanism whereby the gravitational tugs of a nearby object (or objects) flex and bend and contract and expand another object continually. This constant churning causes the victimized object, in this case Europa, to heat up and be considerably more balmy than its great distance from the Sun would otherwise allow it to be.



Even though Theia came to a tragic end, it did not die in vain. This is because the ill-fated Theia made the emergence of life possible on Earth. Our lunar companion is responsible for creating a welcoming abode for living things on our planet, because it moderates Earth's wobble on its axis--thus creating a stable, life-friendly climate. Earth's Moon also is the source of ocean tides that form a rhythm that has guided human beings for thousands of years.



The Giant-Impact Theory, alternatively termed the Theia Impact, or Big Splash Theory, proposes that Earth's Moon was born from the debris remaining from a catastrophic collision, that occurred about 4.3 billion years ago, between the primordial Earth and an unfortunate protoplanet, that was about the size of Mars. The Earth's Moon-forming collision would have occurred when our Solar System was still forming during the Hadean eon. The Hadean eon occurred about 20 to 100 million years after our Solar System emerged from its frigid, dark natal cloud of gas and dust. The doomed impacting protoplanet, often called Theia, received its name in honor of a Titan in Greek mythology who was the mother of Selene, the Moon goddess. An analysis of lunar rocks, published in 2016, indicates that this catastrophic crash was a direct hit--causing a thorough mixing of both Earth-stuff and Theia-stuff. The Giant-Impact Theory is the favored scientific explanation for the birth of Earth's Moon.