Planet.com Saturn the mythology of saturn what the truth Planet.com Saturn

Planet.com Saturn the mythology of saturn what the truth Planet.com Saturn

We found 24++ Images in Planet.com Saturn:




About this page - Planet.com Saturn

Planet.com Saturn Nasa Viz Saturn39s Superstorm Saturn Planet.com, Planet.com Saturn Saturn Planet Lerne Sefe Saturn Planet.com, Planet.com Saturn Saturn Only Visible Planet Through The Month Of April Saturn Planet.com, Planet.com Saturn Saturn Fact Sheet Planet.com Saturn, Planet.com Saturn Saturn Planet Lerne Sefe Saturn Planet.com, Planet.com Saturn Saturn Planet Rings The Old Farmer39s Almanac Planet.com Saturn, Planet.com Saturn Saturn Wikipedia Saturn Planet.com, Planet.com Saturn Nssdca Photo Gallery Saturn Saturn Planet.com.

A little interesting about space life.

Moon jellies are the easiest jellyfish to keep alive in captivity. This is because of their diversity in nature. Moon jellies can be found in almost every ocean in the world. Their natural habitat stretches from the equator as far north as 70 latitude and as far south as 40 in every ocean that falls within those geographic parameters.



and here is another

It is true that even our most powerful telescopes aimed at the landing sites wouldn't see anything. However, not because the Moon landings didn't happen. It is only because of the optical limitations of telescopes themselves, because of their limited size and distance from the Moon.



and finally

Kepler-22b is an extrasolar planet that circles Kepler-22, a G-type star that is situated about 600 light-years from our own planet in the constellation Cygnus. This intriguing new world, that resides beyond our Solar System, was first spotted by NASA's highly productive, though ill-fated, Kepler Space Telescope in 2011. Kepler-22b has the distinction of being the first known transiting extrasolar planet to reside within the so-called habitable zone of its star. The habitable zone is the term used to describe that Goldilocks region around a star where water can exist in its life-loving liquid state. Planets dwelling in this fortunate region are not too hot, not too cold, but just right for water and, hence, life to exist. A planet that circles its star in the habitable zone suggests that there is the possibility--though not the promise--of life as we know it to exist on that world.

More information:

Planetary scientists have long theorized that Theia would have been chemically different from our planet. However, in marked contrast, more recent studies showed that the Moon and Earth appear very much alike when it comes to versions of certain elements termed isotopes--much more so than might be indicated by the current impact model. Isotopes of a particular element possess differing numbers of neutrons from one another.



Following that last giant impact, Earth put on some weight, but this new weight gain was derived from impacts of much smaller bodies, only about the size of asteroids like Vesta. Dr. Jacobson and his team used the later weight gain in order to determine when the unfortunate Theia struck.



Jupiter, like Saturn, is circled by more than 60 known satellites. Many of them are tiny moonlets, measuring only a few miles across, and are probably captured asteroids or minor planets--or their shattered remains.