Printable Different Types of Moons tonights blue moon not what youre expecting julie catona Moons Types Printable of Different

Printable Different Types of Moons tonights blue moon not what youre expecting julie catona Moons Types Printable of Different

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A little interesting about space life.

Our third theory to discuss is the "Co-Formation Theory" which alleges that the Moon and Earth were formed within the nebular disk around the Earth (similar to how our solar system formed around the Sun). This theory falls short when one revisits the composition of the Earth and Moon. If the Moon did indeed share some of the same building material as the Earth did and form in the same area, it should be very similar in composition to the Earth. We've seen, however, that the Moon doesn't share a significant iron core like our home planet does. There is one theory which remains to be discussed, and it is the one that is widely accepted today. The Giant Impactor Theory: The Giant Impactor Theory claims that the Moon was formed when an object the size of Mars slammed into the Earth shortly after the solar system's formation. After this object hit the Earth, tons of material from both the object and the Earth were sent into space and began to orbit around the Earth. This material slowly began to come together and collide until what we see as our Moon was created. This theory most easily explains the criteria we previously mentioned. The heat that would have been generated after the collision explains the evidence of "baking" on the Moon's surface. It also supports the fact that the Moon doesn't have a large iron core like the Earth. Finally, we have seen evidence of other such collisions in other parts of the solar system.



and here is another

Pluto itself is a relatively large denizen of the distant Kuiper Belt, that orbits our Sun in the frigid company of a vast multitude of other bewitching and mysterious icy objects. Like other Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), Pluto is thought to be composed primarily of ice and rock. It is an intriguing frozen "oddball", a mere 1/6 the mass of Earth's own Moon and 1/3 its volume. Pluto also has a highly inclined, eccentric orbit that carries it from 30 to 49 Astronomical Units (AU) from our Sun. One AU is equal to the mean Earth-Sun separation of 93,000,000 miles. As a result, Pluto periodically moves towards our Sun at a distance that is closer to our Star than Neptune. Very fortunately for both Neptune and Pluto, an orbital resonance with Neptune prevents the duo from crashing into each other.



and finally

However, the fact of the matter is that moon will always remain the best option for mankind. The reason for this stems from the fact that the moon can always act as a stepping stone to the rest of the solar system and beyond. This is only natural, as the moon is in a very close proximity to Earth. Only by taking a 3 day trip, it is possible to reach the Moon with standard chemical propulsion techniques. However, in retrospect, going to Mars would require almost 100 times the amount of trip time of moon, since Mars is about 1000 times further then the moon. The amount of life support that is required for a mission that will take 2 years or more is definitely very costly and more importantly, the technological capability is not there. Thus, with our present global financial and technical capability, the moon is the only realistic option.

More information:

Triton is the largest of Neptune's 13 moons. It is an unusual world, twirling around its planet in the wrong direction. Many astronomers think that some time in the remote past, Triton was nudged out of its home in the Kuiper Belt, and during its wanderings in the darkness of interplanetary space, at last swept close enough to Neptune to feel the irresistible lure of that planet's gravity. As Neptune drew Triton into its gravitational embrace, that luckless wanderer from the Kuiper Belt underwent a sea-change from a comet-like denizen of our Solar System's outer limits, to a moon of one of the major planets. So, there Triton whirls around in its new home, circling its planet Neptune, but circling it backwards. And like all moons, it is now a dependent of its parent planet. As a matter of fact, the moon was given the name of Triton as an allusion to the demigod Triton's dependence on the sea-god Neptune in Greek mythology.



Triton also possesses a thin atmosphere composed mainly of nitrogen, and a smaller quantity of methane. This atmosphere probably is the result of Triton's cryovolcanism, which is enhanced by seasonal heating from the Sun. Although little is currently known of Pluto's atmosphere, it is thought to be primarily composed of nitrogen with some carbon monoxide and methane added to the mix--and it is extremely tenuous. Pluto's very thin atmosphere may exist as a gas only when Pluto is nearest to the Sun (perihelion). For most of Pluto's very long year, the atmospheric gases are frozen in the form of ice on its extremely frigid surface. One year on Triton is almost 248 Earth-years long--or 90,471 Earth-days!



Following that last giant impact, Earth put on some weight, but this new weight gain was derived from impacts of much smaller bodies, only about the size of asteroids like Vesta. Dr. Jacobson and his team used the later weight gain in order to determine when the unfortunate Theia struck.