Solar System Exoplanets Map 215 exoplanets everywhere what we are learning Solar Exoplanets System Map

Solar System Exoplanets Map 215 exoplanets everywhere what we are learning Solar Exoplanets System Map

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It is important to know at any age!

Though a moon day is equivalent to 28 earth days, surprisingly, the biological day cycle of the moon people is 24 earth hours. This shows that their biological clock has nothing to do with the sun rise and sun set in the moon. Perhaps the 24 hour period of time may be a unique biological 'interval of renewal' that nature has given to all human species. Usually moon people sleep about eight hours a day at "any time of convenience" and remain active during most of the remaining hours. The "time of convenience" varies for each individual. As a result of not having a particular day or night time, there are always people awake and active all of the time. Therefore, all community based activities take place all the time and continuously without stoppage. There are no holiday systems practiced in the moon. Every day is a working day and every hour is an active hour. Every hour is also a sleeping hour to whoever desires to consider it that way.



and here is another

The true reason you can't see the stars in photos and videos of Moon is not that the stars aren't there, but rather because of the omnipresent sunlight and the exposure limits of cameras.



and finally

Triton and Pluto share roughly the same bulk composition and density, as well as similar atmospheres. In addition, both remote bodies move in unusual orbits. Pluto has a highly eccentric orbit, and is sometimes closer to the Sun than Neptune! Furthermore, Pluto orbits in the opposite direction around our Sun than do the eight major planets of our Solar System. Triton revolves around Neptune in a direction counter to that of its planet--and its retrograde orbit indicates that it is a captured object. Because of the unusual nature of both Triton's and Pluto's orbits, as well as the similarities of their bulk properties and atmospheres, it has long been thought that there is some sort of historical connection between them. Indeed, it was once thought that Pluto was an escaped moon of Neptune, but this is now considered unlikely. It is much more likely that long ago Triton, like Pluto, circled the Sun independently, but was unluckily captured by its adoptive planet--whereas Pluto was left to wander freely.

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Titan is the largest moon of the gas-giant planet Saturn, as well as the second-largest moon in our entire Solar System--after Jupiter's enormous Ganymede. Indeed, this smoggy orange moon is almost as big as the planet Mars! Because Titan is situated in the outer domain of our Solar System, circling Saturn--which is the sixth major planet from our Star, the Sun--it is extremely cold, and its chemical atmosphere is frozen. This very interesting atmosphere is composed of a mix of compounds that many astronomers think are comparable to those that existed in our own planet's primordial atmosphere. Titan's strange, dense, orange atmosphere contains large quantities of "smoggy" hydrocarbons. This very heavy shroud of obscuring smog is so extremely dense that it showers "gasoline-like" rain down on the tortured surface of this distant moon-world.



Earth's Moon is a brilliant, beguiling, bewitching companion world. The largest and brightest object in our planet's night sky, it has for eons been the source of wild magical tales, myths, and poetry--as well as an ancient symbol for romantic love. Some traditional tales tell of a man's face etched on its bright surface, while still others whisper haunting childhood stories of a "Moon Rabbit". Lovely, ancient, and fantastic stories aside, Earth's Moon is a real object, a large rocky sphere that has been with our planet almost from the very beginning, when our Solar System was first forming over four billion years ago. But where did Earth's Moon come from? In April 2014, a team of planetary scientists announced that they had pinned down the birth date of the Moon to within 100 million years of the formation of our Solar System, and this new discovery indicates that Earth's Moon was most likely born about 4.47 billion years ago in a gigantic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth.



According to the new theory, moon-formation starts at the very edge of a planetary ring, where a fragile baby moon can begin to emerge without the danger of being ripped apart by the fierce gravity of its parent planet. These dancing little moonlets, formed from ring-material, then travel outward. As the ring-system continually produces moonlet after moonlet after moonlet, the small icy worlds coalesce to form increasingly larger moons. The larger moons, in turn, may also merge together, as they dance outward from their parent planet.

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