Solar System Grade 4 good ideas for 5th grade solar system projects page 4 System Grade Solar 4

Solar System Grade 4 good ideas for 5th grade solar system projects page 4 System Grade Solar 4

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It is important to know at any age!

Moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) are from the phylum Cnidaria. This phylum contains over 9,000 aquatic species. There are 10 nearly identical species in the genus Aurelia collectively referred to as moon jellyfish. In fact, they are so close morphologically that it takes DNA testing to distinguish one species from another.



and here is another

Earth's bewitching large Moon was probably born as the result of an immense impact, when a Mars-size protoplanet named Theia smashed into Earth about 4.5 billion years ago. This cataclysmic collision is thought to have hurled a vast amount of Earth-stuff and Theia-stuff into orbit around our ancient planet. Debris from the two unfortunate bodies gradually accumulated to give birth to our Moon, as tumbling little newborn moonlets crashed into one another and melded together into one large object.



and finally

Gravity can pull binary systems apart when the sister objects travel too close to a massive body--such as the planet Neptune. The orbital motions of the two sister objects results in one member traveling slower than the other. This can disrupt the system and permanently alter the orbital companion. This mechanism is termed an exchange reaction, and it could have shot Triton into a number of different orbits around Neptune, Agnor continued.

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NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft was the first to visit Titan back in 1980. Although Voyager 1 made a truly heroic journey, it proved unsuccessful in its efforts to obtain close-up pictures of Titan's veiled surface. This adventurous, early space mission was not able to obtain the desired images because it could not cut through the dense orange smog--and the resulting images showed only some minor brightness and color variations in Titan's atmosphere. In 1994, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) did succeed in obtaining some precious and revealing images of Titan's well-hidden surface--showing the existence of a bright and sparkling continent dubbed Xanadu--after the "Xanadu" of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's romantic poem Kubla Khan. Titan's Xanadu glitters as if lit by the cold fires of a multitude of sparkling rhinestones.



"This means that at the atomic level, the Earth and the Moon are identical. This new information challenged the giant impact theory for lunar formation," study lead author Dr. Seth Jacobson told Space.com on April 2, 2014. Dr. Jacobson is a planetary scientist at the Cote d'Azur Observatory in Nice, France.



A moon is a natural body that orbits a planet, and is held in its orbit by the force of both the host planet's gravity and the gravity of the moon itself. Some planets sport moons; some do not. Most of the moons dwelling in our Solar System are frigid (and sometimes weird) little worlds, made up of ice and rock, that swarm around the outer giant, gaseous planets of our Sun's bewitching family--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. One example of such bewitching weirdness is the frozen, little icy moon Hyperion, of the ringed-planet Saturn, that looks like an icy natural sponge.