Solar System Grade 4 solar system third grade math lesson plan Solar 4 System Grade

Solar System Grade 4 solar system third grade math lesson plan Solar 4 System Grade

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It is important to know at any age!

Last night there was a full moon. One of my dogs was very on edge, starting at every sound, staring out into the darkness at something I could neither hear nor see. The other 4 dogs were sound asleep. Did she sense something different about the moonlit night?



and here is another

When these photos were taken, it was full daylight on the Moon. Because there is only an extremely thin atmosphere on the Moon,the sky appears black. In addition, sunlight at the Moon's surface was incomparably strong with the starlight; the stars simply faded in comparison with the sun. If the astronauts used sufficiently long exposures, stars would, indeed, be visible.



and finally

Galileo Galilei first spotted the planet Neptune with his primitive "spyglass" on December 28, 1612. He observed it again on January 27, 1613. Unfortunately, on both occasions, Galileo thought that the giant, remote planet was a fixed star, appearing near the planet Jupiter in the dark night sky. Because of this mistake, Galileo is not credited with the discovery of Neptune.

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Planetary scientists have long theorized that Theia would have been chemically different from our planet. However, in marked contrast, more recent studies showed that the Moon and Earth appear very much alike when it comes to versions of certain elements termed isotopes--much more so than might be indicated by the current impact model. Isotopes of a particular element possess differing numbers of neutrons from one another.



In 2010 and 2011, the French astrophysicists devised their model to explain how the moons of Saturn were born. They based their findings on data derived from the Cassini probe--that is investigating the Saturn-system--and on numerical simulations. The team found that Saturn's bewitching rings, which are slender disks composed of tiny chunks of gleaming ice surrounding the giant planet, gave rise to the icy moons. This happened because the rings spread as time went by--and when the rings attained a critical distance from the planet (termed the Roche limit), their ends melded together and created small worldlets that broke off and floated away. In this way the rings created the icy moons orbiting Saturn.



Such moon-forming mergers and collisions are not unheard of. For example, the leading theory explaining the formation of Earth's own large Moon, suggests that it was born about 4.5 billion years ago when a Mars-sized protoplanet, dubbed Theia by astronomers, collided with our planet. Just as our Moon is identical geologically to Earth's mantle, the six medium-sized icy sister moons of Saturn are all similar in composition to Titan's icy mantle, the researchers announced in October 2012.