Solar System Walk Scale solar walk 3d solar system model iphone app review System Walk Scale Solar

Solar System Walk Scale solar walk 3d solar system model iphone app review System Walk Scale Solar

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In this fascinating new research, the astronomers announced that they have discovered that a duo of Pluto's moons, dubbed Nix and Hydra, are actually in a chaotic rotation. This basically means that an observer standing on the alien surface of icy, strange Pluto, would not observe the same face of its moons from one night to the next. For those observers visiting the two bizarre moons themselves, things would be even weirder because every day would be a different length from the one that came before it.



and here is another

Multiple Light Sources. On the moon, there is only one light source sufficiently strong to form shadows; the Sun. So it is solid to suggest that all shadows on the Moon should run parallel to each other. However, this was apparently not the case during the moon landing.



and finally

It is true that even our most powerful telescopes aimed at the landing sites wouldn't see anything. However, not because the Moon landings didn't happen. It is only because of the optical limitations of telescopes themselves, because of their limited size and distance from the Moon.

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Earth's Moon is the fifth largest moon in our Solar System, and the only world beyond our own that we have walked upon, leaving our footprints behind in moon dust as a silent testimony that once we existed, and had been there. Our Moon is both the brightest and largest object in Earth's night sky, and many astronomers think that our bewitching lunar companion was born as a result of an ancient collision between our planet and an ill-fated Mars-sized protoplanet that has been named Theia. There are other theories that have been devised to explain our Moon's origin, but the Giant Impact theory is considered to be the best explanation. When the doomed Theia blasted into the primordial Earth, it launched into the sky above our planet the debris resulting from that catastrophic crash. The debris eventually coalesced into Earth's Moon.



Alas, this is not the case with Phobos and Deimos. Phobos, the larger of the duo of little Martian moons, at 22 kilometers in diameter, is lazily tumbling towards Mars and will approach the Roche limit in about 20 million years. At this tragic point, it will shatter into fragments that will ultimately form a spectacular ring around its planet. Only Deimos will remain--bereft of its companion. Deimos is the smaller moon of the pair, and circles its parent-planet further out. This last remaining little moon will be a lonely object lingering in the Martian sky at this sad point--but it was not always thus. The new 2016 study suggests that Mars once possessed a very complex system of many moons.



By studying how the four inner planets evolved and grew--using more than 250 computer simulations--the planetary scientists discovered that if the Moon-birthing blast had happened early, the quantity of material accreted onto Earth afterward would be enormous. If the impact had occurred late, the amount of material would be relatively small.